American Society for Dermatologic Surgery

American Society for Dermatologic Surgery

Source:

LaTowsky B, et al. A prospective, non-randomized, multicenter pivotal study of Nano-Pulse Stimulation (NPS) technology for cutaneous warts on the feet. Presented at: American Society for Dermatologic Surgery annual meeting; Oct 9-11, 2020 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: This study was sponsored by Pulse Biosciences.
October 09, 2020
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Nanosecond pulsed treatment promising in clearing plantar warts

Source:

LaTowsky B, et al. A prospective, non-randomized, multicenter pivotal study of Nano-Pulse Stimulation (NPS) technology for cutaneous warts on the feet. Presented at: American Society for Dermatologic Surgery annual meeting; Oct 9-11, 2020 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: This study was sponsored by Pulse Biosciences.
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Nano-Pulse Stimulation is a promising therapy for patients with recalcitrant plantar warts, according to a poster presentation at the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery annual meeting.

“The unique ability of non-thermal Nano-Pulse Stimulation (NPS) technology to target cells within the treatment zone while sparing the non-cellular dermis provides the basis for the treatment of cutaneous, non-genital warts,” Brenda LaTowsky, MD, of Clear Dermatology & Aesthetics Center in Scottsdale, Arizona, and colleagues wrote. “Cutaneous warts on the feet are difficult to treat, and this larger pivotal study further examines the effects of NPS treatments on these persistent warts.”

In the prospective, non-randomized, multicenter pivotal study, 12 subjects underwent NPS (Pulse Biosciences) treatment. Subjects returned for follow-up at day 7 and monthly through month 4, with additional NPS treatments administered as needed at months 1, 2 and 3. A 6-point size reduction scale was used for outcome assessments 60 days after treatment. Treated warts were compared with untreated controls.

Of 33 warts, 45.5% were clear 60 days after treatment; 46.7% cleared with one treatment, 46.7% cleared with two treatments and 6.7% cleared with three treatments. Pain was reported at a median of 2.5 during treatment on a scale of 0 to 10, with 38.3% of subjects reporting a score of 0 or 1. No serious adverse events or cases of hyperpigmentation were reported. Further, 45.5% of control warts were clear at day 120.

“NPS technology cleared 56.5% of plantar warts, the vast majority of which had a history of prior treatments,” the authors wrote. “NPS looks to be a promising therapy for these difficult to treat, recalcitrant plantar warts.”