Discoveries in Heart Failure

Discoveries in Heart Failure

Source:

Adhikari G, et al. P1787. Presented at: American Heart Association Scientific Sessions; Nov. 13-15, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Adhikari reports no relevant financial disclosures.
December 03, 2021
1 min read
Save

Vitamin D deficiency associated with longer hospital stay in acute HF

Source:

Adhikari G, et al. P1787. Presented at: American Heart Association Scientific Sessions; Nov. 13-15, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Adhikari reports no relevant financial disclosures.
You've successfully added to your alerts. You will receive an email when new content is published.

Click Here to Manage Email Alerts

We were unable to process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this issue please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Vitamin D deficiency status was linked to increased length of stay, but lower in-hospital mortality, in patients hospitalized with acute HF, according to a presentation from the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions.

“Vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent in patients with congestive heart failure and associated with adverse clinical outcomes,” Govinda Adhikari, MD, of McLaren Flint Hospital, Michigan, said during the presentation.

Using National Inpatient Sample (NIS) data from 2016 to 2017, Adhikari and colleagues investigated whether vitamin D deficiency was associated with in-hospital mortality or length of stay among adult patients hospitalized with acute HF. They conducted bivariate analyses, such as chi-square and Fisher’s exact test with categorical variables and mean and median test for length of stay, to determine group differences among patients with acute HF. They accounted for comorbidities using the Charlson comorbidity index.

Of 177,811 acute HF discharges, 3,542 patients had vitamin D deficiency.

The results showed vitamin D deficiency status was linked to a 31.5% lower risk for in-hospital mortality compared with non-vitamin D deficiency status (adjusted OR = 0.68; 95% CI, 0.54- 0.87).

However, the investigators reported a statistically significant increase in length of stay (beta = 0.95; 95% CI, 0.06-0.13) in patients with vitamin D deficiency compared with those without.

“Despite the limitation of our retrospective database based solely on the days of the diagnosis, we hypothesized the possibility that most patients labeled as [vitamin D deficiency] on the days of the diagnosis most likely were taking vitamin D supplements, which might have accounted for the protective effect on the in-hospital mortality,” Adhikari said.