Cardio-Oncology Resource Center

Cardio-Oncology Resource Center

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Press Release

July 03, 2021
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AHA donates $11 million toward cardio-oncology research on disparities

Source:

Press Release

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The American Heart Association announced it donated more than $11 million in research grants to four multidisciplinary teams researching disparities in cardio-oncology.

L. Kristin Newby

“While the evolution of new therapies has improved the prognosis of many cancer patients, we’ve seen new challenges emerge as the very treatments that can cure people of cancer can also lead to short- and long-term CVD complications,” Cardiology Today Editorial Board Member L. Kristin Newby, MD, professor of medicine at Duke University School of Medicine and chair of the AHA’s peer review team for the selection of the new grant recipients, said in a press release.

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AHA chose research teams at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University, Boston University School of Medicine, the Medical College of Wisconsin and the University of Pennsylvania to receive $2.7 million each for this project. The funding is for projects designed to reduce deficiencies related to disparities in cardio-oncology while also exploring new ways to prevent CVD among patients with cancer, according to the release.

According to the release, the teams will be focused on developing solutions to identify and address how the combination of heart disease and cancer disproportionately affects underrepresented populations when combined.

The disparities in cardio-oncology research is one of AHA’s Strategically Focused Research Networks. According to the release, the projects are as follows: Obesity-Related Disparities in the Bidirectional Risk of Cardiovascular Disease and Cancer (Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University), Cancer-Associated Thromboembolism as Affected by Health Disparities (Boston University School of Medicine), Understanding and Addressing Disparities in Cancer Therapy-Induced Inflammation and Associated Endothelial Dysfunction (Medical College of Wisconsin) and Understanding and Reducing Racial Disparities in High-Risk Cardio-Oncology Communities (University of Pennsylvania).