Heart Rhythm Society
Heart Rhythm Society
Source:

Shi Z, et al. LBCT01-05. Presented at: Heart Rhythm Society Annual Scientific Sessions; May 6-9, 2020 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Shi reports no relevant financial disclosures.
May 12, 2020
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Smartwatch notifications improve medication adherence for AF

Source:

Shi Z, et al. LBCT01-05. Presented at: Heart Rhythm Society Annual Scientific Sessions; May 6-9, 2020 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: Shi reports no relevant financial disclosures.
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Patients with atrial fibrillation who received smartwatch notifications in addition to standard care had better adherence to oral anticoagulation compared with those who received standard care alone, according to data presented at the virtual Heart Rhythm Society Annual Scientific Sessions.

In this multicenter, prospective, randomized controlled trial, Zhan Shi, MD, of Beijing Chao-yang Hospital at Capital Medical University, and colleagues analyzed data from 160 patients with AF who were assigned a smartwatch reminder (mean age, 69 years) or standard care (mean age, 70 years).

Patients assigned standard of care were scheduled for outpatient visits and received regular follow-up calls. Those in the smartwatch reminder group received daily intake reminders and intake errors including missed or delayed doses from their smartwatch in addition to standard care. These patients also had the ability to use an immediate telephone feedback function,

Adherence was assessed using the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS), a self-reported measure, and the proportion of days covered, an objective measure. A score of 8 on the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale indicated adherence, in addition to a cutoff of 80% or greater for proportion of days covered.

During 9 months of follow-up, both groups were taking approximately four drugs each for antiarrhythmic and antihypertensive treatment (P = .519).

In patients assigned standard care alone, the proportion of those with an MMAS score of 8 decreased from 66.3% in the first month to 40% at 9 months. A similar trend was noted for the proportion of days covered of 80% or greater in this group, which decreased from 75% at the first month to 30% at 9 months.

In contrast, the proportion of those with an MMAS score of 8 in patients assigned smartwatch reminders increased from 62.5% at 1 month to 77.8% at 9 months. The number of patients with a proportion of days covered of 80% or greater was more than 90% throughout the 9-month period.

“A smartwatch that can send medication reminders can significantly improve adherence to [oral anticoagulation] therapy in patients with AF,” Shi said during the presentation. – by Darlene Dobkowski

Reference:

Shi Z, et al. LBCT01-05. Presented at: Heart Rhythm Society Annual Scientific Sessions; May 6-9, 2020 (virtual meeting).

Disclosure: Shi reports no relevant financial disclosures.