June 12, 2019
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Hypertensive disorders during pregnancy increase CVD risk

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Women with a history of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy had an increased risk for CVD, according to a study published in JAMA Cardiology.

The increased risk was associated with increased levels of modifiable, conventional CV risk factors, according to the study.

Eirin B. Haug, PhD, postdoctoral researcher in the department of public health and nursing at Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim, and colleagues analyzed data from 23,885 women who were parous. Women were assessed for history of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, defined as either preeclampsia or gestational hypertension at age 40 years or younger.

Questionnaires, interviews and examinations were conducted to collect information on smoking status, work titles, highest obtained educational level, current antihypertensive use, family history of CHD and CV risk factors. Medical records were also assessed for CV events.

Of the women in the study, 9% had a history of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy at age 40 years or younger. Compared with women aged 40 to 70 years with normotensive pregnancies, those in the same age range with a history of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy had an increased risk for CVD (HR = 1.57; 95% CI, 1.32-1.87). This was not seen in women older than 70 years (beta = 0.98; 95% CI, 0.96-1; P for interaction by age = .01).

Up to 77% of the excess risk for CVD in women with a history of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy was linked to BP and BMI. Smaller proportions of this risk were associated with lipid and glucose levels.

Women with a history of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy had an increased risk for CVD, according to a study published in JAMA Cardiology.
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“Blood pressure plays a substantial role in driving the excess cardiovascular risk in women who experiences preeclampsia and an even larger role in women who experienced gestational hypertension,” Haug and colleagues wrote. “The association of conventional risk factors, in particular blood pressure and BMI, with the development of CVD in women with history [of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy] indicate that preventive efforts aimed at decreasing the levels of these risk factors could reduce cardiovascular risk in women with history of [hypertensive disorders of pregnancy].” – by Darlene Dobkowski

Disclosures: Haug reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.