April 22, 2019
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Skipping breakfast increases CVD mortality risk

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Adults who skipped breakfast had a significantly increased risk for CV mortality, according to a study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Shuang Rong, MD, PhD, of the department of nutrition and food hygiene at Wuhan University of Science and Technology in China and of the department of epidemiology at University of Iowa College of Public Health in Iowa City, and colleagues analyzed data from 6,550 participants (mean age, 53 years; 48% men) from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III aged 40 to 75 years who were free from CVD or cancer at baseline.

Questionnaires were completed to collect information such as breakfast frequency and categorized as never (n = 336), rarely (n = 713), some days (n = 1,639) and every day (n = 3,862). Participants were followed up until death or Dec. 31, 2011, for a median of 18.8 years.

During follow-up, there were 2,318 deaths including 619 deaths from CVD. Participants who never consumed breakfast had an HR for all-cause mortality of 1.19 (95% CI, 0.99-1.42) and 1.87 for CV mortality (95% CI, 1.14-3.04) after adjusting for socioeconomic status, race/ethnicity, sex, age, dietary and lifestyle factors, BMI and CV risk factors.

“Taken together, [previous] studies as well as our findings underscore the importance of eating breakfast as a simple way to promote cardiovascular health and prevent cardiovascular morbidity and mortality,” Rong and colleagues wrote.

Adults who skipped breakfast had a significantly increased risk for CV mortality, according to a study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
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“What is clear is that a pattern of skipping breakfast identifies a population at risk,” Borja Ibáñez, MD, PHD, professor at the Spanish National Centre for Cardiovascular Research in Madrid, and Juan M. Fernández-Alvira, PhD, postdoctoral researcher at the Spanish National Centre for Cardiovascular Research, wrote in a related editorial. “Surveying the breakfast pattern might be useful in improving risk prediction in the general population. In fact, CV risk scores accounting only for lifestyle habits (ie, without laboratory tests), such as the Fuster-BEWAT score or the ideal cardiovascular health score, have been shown to be able to predict atherosclerosis presence. Including a question related to breakfast pattern might further improve the performance of such scores.” – by Darlene Dobkowski

Disclosures: The authors, Ibáñez and Fernández-Alvira report no relevant financial disclosures.