American College of Cardiology
American College of Cardiology
Perspective from Randall M. Zusman, MD
March 20, 2019
2 min read
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Midday naps lower BP in patients with hypertension

Perspective from Randall M. Zusman, MD
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Manolis Kallistratos
Manolis Kallistratos

NEW ORLEANS — Among patients with arterial hypertension, those who napped in midday had lower BP compared with those who did not take a nap, independent of dipping status, according to findings presented at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session.

Researchers analyzed 212 patients with hypertension (mean age, 63 years; 54% women; mean BP, 129.9/76.7 mm Hg) to determine whether midday napping status affected BP in this population. Among the cohort, 74.6% did not have diabetes, 70.3% did not smoke and 81.4% did not consume alcohol.

Compared with no midday naps, those who reported napping had lower mean 24-hour ambulatory systolic BP (127.6 mm Hg vs. 132.9 mm Hg), daytime systolic BP (128.7 mm Hg vs. 134.5 mm Hg) and daytime diastolic BP (76.2 mm Hg vs. 79.5 mm Hg; P < .005 for all), according to the researchers.

“The patients who napped were predominantly older, but nonetheless had lower blood pressure levels in comparison to those did not have a habit of sleep during midday,” Manolis Kallistratos, MD, cardiologist at the Asklepieion General Hospital in Voula, Greece, said during a consumer web briefing. “On the other hand, we didn’t have any other differences in terms of echocardiographic parameters.”

There was no correlation between the BP/napping relationship and dipping status.

When the researchers conducted a linear regression model, each 60 minutes of midday sleep was associated with a 3-mm Hg decrease in 24-hour ambulatory systolic BP (P < .001).

“Some people may argue that this blood pressure decrease may be small, but we know a decrease in systolic BP as small as 3 mm Hg may decrease risk for cardiovascular events by as much as 10%,” Kallistratos said during the web briefing. “It appears that midday sleep is as potent as other lifestyle changes.”

Among patients with arterial hypertension, those who napped in midday had lower BP compared with those who did not take a nap, independent of dipping status, according to findings presented at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session.
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“This is an important study in terms of showing the association between daytime naps and reduction in blood pressure,” Salim Virani, MD, PhD, FACC, chair of the ACC Council for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and professor in the section of cardiovascular research at Baylor College of Medicine, said during the web briefing. “Obviously it does not take away from the emphasis on reduction of other risk factors.”– by Erik Swain

Reference:

Poulimenos L, et al. Abstract 1332-439. Presented at: American College of Cardiology Scientific Session; March 16-18, 2019; New Orleans.

Disclosures: Kallistratos and Virani report no relevant financial disclosures.