International Stroke Conference
International Stroke Conference
March 12, 2019
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Highlights from ISC: Use of opioids, e-cigarettes, alcohol may contribute to stroke

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The International Stroke Conference, held Feb. 5 to 8 in Honolulu, featured a wide range of studies that expanded the knowledge base about stroke. Below are selected highlights from coverage of the meeting by Cardiology Today, including a trial demonstrating efficacy of a factor Xa inhibitor reversal agent, a study showing potential benefits of cilostazol for secondary stroke prevention and data delineating the relationship between stroke and factors such as opioid abuse, electronic cigarette use and alcohol consumption.

ANNEXA-4: Andexanet alfa successfully reverses factor Xa inhibitor effects

Andexanet alfa reversed the anticoagulation effects of factor Xa inhibitors in most patients with acute major bleeding caused by a factor Xa inhibitor, according to the full data from the ANNEXA-4 study presented at the International Stroke Conference.

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Adding cilostazol to antiplatelet therapy reduces recurrent ischemic stroke risk

Stroke survivors who had cilostazol added to aspirin or clopidogrel had reduced risk for recurrent ischemic stroke compared with patients taking aspirin or clopidogrel alone, according to results from the CSPS.com study presented at the International Stroke Conference.

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Spike in infective endocarditis-related stroke coincides with opioid abuse rise

A sharp increase in U.S. hospitalization rates for stroke from opioid-related infective endocarditis since 2008 has coincided with the rise of the opioid epidemic, according to data presented at the International Stroke Conference.

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Patients who used electronic cigarettes had an increased risk for stroke, MI and angina or CHD, according to data presented at the International Stroke Conference, held Feb. 5 to 8 in Honolulu.
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E-cigarette use tied to higher odds of stroke

Patients who used electronic cigarettes had an increased risk for stroke, MI and angina or CHD, according to data presented at the International Stroke Conference.

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Intensive BP lowering reduces brain bleeds in ischemic stroke

Utilizing intensive BP lowering safely reduced intracerebral hemorrhage in patients with acute ischemic stroke, according to data from the ENCHANTED trial presented at the International Stroke Conference.

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SUCCEED: Community-based care fails to decrease systolic BP after stroke

Community and chronic care model teams did not improve systolic BP more than usual care in patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack, according to data from the SUCCEED trial presented at the International Stroke Conference.

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DESERVE: Positive health beliefs appear to reduce systolic BP after stroke, TIA

Patients who had a mild to moderate stroke or transient ischemic attack and were aware that they could protect themselves against having a stroke had a greater systolic BP reduction compared with those who did not know that they could decrease their risk, according to data from the DESERVE study presented at the International Stroke Conference.

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Modest daily drinking increases risk for ischemic stroke

Adults who drink a modest amount of alcohol daily had an increased risk for ischemic stroke, according to data presented at the International Stroke Conference.
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Vaccination, antiviral treatment fails to affect stroke risk from herpes zoster

Contracting herpes zoster increased risk for acute ischemic stroke, and among patients with herpes zoster, vaccination or antiviral treatment did not modify the risk, according to data presented at the International Stroke Conference.

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Intensive BP reduction strategy fails to lower stroke recurrence

Intensive BP lowering did not significantly reduce stroke recurrence, according to data from the RESPECT study presented at the International Stroke Conference.

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