Association for Healthcare Social Media
Association for Healthcare Social Media
Source/Disclosures
Source:

Katz M. YouTube Education Improves Patient Understanding of Management of Bleeding on Dual Antiplatelet Therapy. Presented at: Association for Healthcare Social Media meeting; July 26, 2020 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.
August 18, 2020
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YouTube as educational tool in MI may help patients understand DAPT use after PCI

Source/Disclosures
Source:

Katz M. YouTube Education Improves Patient Understanding of Management of Bleeding on Dual Antiplatelet Therapy. Presented at: Association for Healthcare Social Media meeting; July 26, 2020 (virtual meeting).

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.
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YouTube was found to be an effective tool for educating patients who had PCI for MI on their condition and the significance of adherence to their prescribed dual antiplatelet therapy, researchers reported.

For the study presented at the virtual Association for Healthcare Social Media meeting, investigators administered two tests to 21 patients with acute MI who had PCI that evaluated their understanding of the importance of adherence to DAPT. In between the two tests, patients were shown a standardized educational YouTube video that addressed their condition and why they were prescribed DAPT.

Doctor and Patient Practicing Telemedicine
Source: Adobe Stock.

“PCI with coronary stenting is nothing without appropriate concurrent and complimentary medications like dual antiplatelet therapy, and medications only work if the patients take them,” Marc Katz, MD, cardiology fellow at St. Luke’s University Hospital in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, said during the presentation. “We’ve all experienced that we have a limited amount of time in clinic and at bedside with our patients, and there are many reasons why a patient might not take their medications as prescribed, but not understanding why they’re taking their meds and not understanding the possible side effects shouldn’t be one of them.”

Each patient (mean age, 63 years; 38.9% women; 9% with prior DAPT) was administered the same exam of four true or false statements:

  • Antiplatelet medications help prevent future heart attacks by preventing platelets from activating and forming clots inside stents placed in the heart.
  • Stopping DAPT early may lead to serious complications.
  • While taking DAPT, if bleeding occurs, it is most commonly a nuisance or nonserious bleeding and DAPT should be continued.
  • DAPT may be stopped without confirming with a cardiologist.

According to the study, the average pre-test score was 73% and the average post-test score was 97%. The average post-test score increased by 24%, and researchers observed an improvement in post-test test scores using the chi-square test (P < .01).

Investigators noted that the most common incorrect answer was for the question regarding bleeds while on DAPT. All patients who initially answered that question incorrectly answered it correctly on the post-intervention test.

“This YouTube video might be another educational modality to not only educate patients, but also for patients to be able to help educate their loved ones about what happened to them and why they’re taking some medications,” Katz said during the presentation. “The time we spend with our patients is limited, and YouTube videos created by trusted health care professionals can be valuable, visually appealing and entertaining educational tools to extend that time that we have with our patients outside of the contemporary walls of the hospital or the clinic.”

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