Source/Disclosures
Source:

Press Release

Disclosures: The survey was sponsored in part by Medtronic. Grubb reports no relevant financial disclosures.
August 08, 2020
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Survey: Patients with valvular disease prioritize returning to active living

Source/Disclosures
Source:

Press Release

Disclosures: The survey was sponsored in part by Medtronic. Grubb reports no relevant financial disclosures.
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Patients with valvular heart disease were satisfied with transcatheter aortic valve replacement and many made their treatment decisions with returning to active living in mind, according to a survey released by a patient advocacy group.

In the survey, conducted by the patient group heart-valve-surgery.com and supported in part by Medtronic, 98% of those who underwent TAVR said they were satisfied with it, and 49% said returning to active living was a major factor in their treatment decision.

Source: Adobe Stock.

The survey, which represents the kickoff of the Active Living Awareness Initiative, included responses from more than 3,400 patients (50% women; 72% older than age 60), of whom 94% said they had valvular heart disease and 53% said they had aortic stenosis, according to a press release from the organization.

Among those with valvular heart disease, 90% said their treatment decision was greatly influenced by conversations with their doctor, while 55% cited their own online research and 28% cited conversations with family and friends, according to the release.

In addition, 27% of those with valvular heart disease said they wish they had sought treatment earlier, 85% said the reputation of the doctor or hospital played a factor in their decision and 62% said the center’s procedural success rate played a factor.

Among patients who had a heart valve procedure, 82% said being able to exercise again was important, while 46% cited returning to work and 45% cited returning to travel, according to the survey.

In addition, among those who had a procedure, 56% cited less time in the hospital as a top benefit of a minimally invasive procedure and 55% cited a faster return to an active lifestyle, the organization said in the release.

“With the majority of heart valve patients reporting conversations with their doctors as the most important factor in their treatment choice, the importance in seeking treatment early and having an informed dialogue with their physicians cannot be overstated,” Kendra Grubb, MD, surgical director of the Structural Heart and Valve Center at Emory Healthcare in Atlanta, said in the release. “These conditions need to be taken seriously early on, and we want patients to know that meeting with their doctor and considering all the factors is a vital first step in getting healthy again.”