Meeting News

Acquired factors lead to arteriovenous fistula clotting in patients on dialysis

Venkata A. Yalamanchili

WASHINGTON — In patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis, acquired thrombotic factors contributed to recurrent arteriovenous fistula clotting, according to data presented at ASN Kidney Week.

Venkata A. Yalamanchili, MD, and colleagues evaluated the relationship between hereditary and acquired thrombotic factors contributing to AVF thrombosis. Researchers conducted a cross-sectional observational study of 100 patients on hemodialysis — 50 patients with recurrent AVF failure and 50 patients with a well-working AVF.

Hereditary thrombotic factors – factor V leiden, factor XIII, prothrombin and MTHFR by DNR isolation and PCR products, and acquired thrombotic factors – lipoprotein (a), fibrinogen using immunoturbidimetry, homocysteine by enzyme recyclic and anticardiolipin antibody lgG and lgM by ELISA method, were studied, Yalamanchili and colleagues wrote in their abstract.

Researchers identified that hereditary factors were not significantly different between the AVF failure and working AVF groups, but the acquired factors were elevated in the recurrent AVF thrombosis group compared with the control group. They found a significant link between recurrent vascular access thrombosis and non-O blood groups.

In patients with recurrent vascular access thrombosis, anemia was observed compared to patients with well-working fistulas, Yalamanchili and colleagues wrote.

“The next step will be what we can do about these findings to reduce this cause of thrombosis,” Yalamanchili told Healio Nephrology. – by Earl Holland Jr.

Reference:

Reddy S, et al. Abstract P0348. Presented at: ASN Kidney Week; Nov. 7-10, 2019; Washington D.C.

Disclosure: Yalamanchili reports no relevant financial disclosures.

Venkata A. Yalamanchili

WASHINGTON — In patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis, acquired thrombotic factors contributed to recurrent arteriovenous fistula clotting, according to data presented at ASN Kidney Week.

Venkata A. Yalamanchili, MD, and colleagues evaluated the relationship between hereditary and acquired thrombotic factors contributing to AVF thrombosis. Researchers conducted a cross-sectional observational study of 100 patients on hemodialysis — 50 patients with recurrent AVF failure and 50 patients with a well-working AVF.

Hereditary thrombotic factors – factor V leiden, factor XIII, prothrombin and MTHFR by DNR isolation and PCR products, and acquired thrombotic factors – lipoprotein (a), fibrinogen using immunoturbidimetry, homocysteine by enzyme recyclic and anticardiolipin antibody lgG and lgM by ELISA method, were studied, Yalamanchili and colleagues wrote in their abstract.

Researchers identified that hereditary factors were not significantly different between the AVF failure and working AVF groups, but the acquired factors were elevated in the recurrent AVF thrombosis group compared with the control group. They found a significant link between recurrent vascular access thrombosis and non-O blood groups.

In patients with recurrent vascular access thrombosis, anemia was observed compared to patients with well-working fistulas, Yalamanchili and colleagues wrote.

“The next step will be what we can do about these findings to reduce this cause of thrombosis,” Yalamanchili told Healio Nephrology. – by Earl Holland Jr.

Reference:

Reddy S, et al. Abstract P0348. Presented at: ASN Kidney Week; Nov. 7-10, 2019; Washington D.C.

Disclosure: Yalamanchili reports no relevant financial disclosures.

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