Meeting News

Study: ANG-3777 improves renal function in transplant recipients with delayed graft function

Tracy Mayne

WASHINGTON — ANG-3777, a hepatocyte growth factor mimetic, may be an effective treatment for delayed graft function in patients undergoing kidney transplant, according to study results presented at ASN Kidney Week.

“Currently, there are no treatments for delayed graft function, which is a major predictor of graft failure,” Tracy Mayne, PhD, vice president of medical affairs at Angion Biomedica, told Healio Nephrology. “If you compare the costs of dialysis vs. transplant, you find that dialysis is one of the leading drivers of costs in Medicare. Transplant costs are much lower, so it’s a more efficacious therapy that has better medical outcomes and is cheaper; it’s what’s known as a dominant strategy.” He said ANG-3777 could be the first treatment for delayed graft function, adding that “We’re not pre-treating patients; we’re treating patients who have had transplants and their kidneys are not functioning right. “

Participants who demonstrated signs and symptoms of delayed graft function were randomized to either placebo or ANG-3777 by IV infusion (first dose given 24 to 36 hours after transplant).

Researchers found patients taking ANG-3777 were nearly twice as likely to achieve the primary outcome of 1200 cc of urine output per day by day 28 (79% vs. 44% of those taking placebo). Furthermore, researchers observed improvements in urine output by day 2 in those in the ANG-3777 group.

In addition, by day 14, there was a 13-point difference in eGFR between the two groups (favoring ANG-3777) that was maintained throughout the study period.

Mayne said that although this was a small study, it is important to note that two graft failures occurred in the placebo group vs. none in ANG-3777 group.

“For a number of reasons, nephrologists and transplant surgeons are afraid of taking kidneys that are less than perfect,” he said. “There is a huge number of wasted kidneys in the United States. Treatment with ANG-3777 may have the potential to increase the amount of organs that get transplanted.” – by Melissa J. Webb

Reference:

Bromberg J, et al. Abstract TH-PO1213. Presented at: ASN Kidney Week; Nov. 7-10, 2019; Washington D.C.

Disclosure: Mayne reports being an employee of Angion Biomedica.

Tracy Mayne

WASHINGTON — ANG-3777, a hepatocyte growth factor mimetic, may be an effective treatment for delayed graft function in patients undergoing kidney transplant, according to study results presented at ASN Kidney Week.

“Currently, there are no treatments for delayed graft function, which is a major predictor of graft failure,” Tracy Mayne, PhD, vice president of medical affairs at Angion Biomedica, told Healio Nephrology. “If you compare the costs of dialysis vs. transplant, you find that dialysis is one of the leading drivers of costs in Medicare. Transplant costs are much lower, so it’s a more efficacious therapy that has better medical outcomes and is cheaper; it’s what’s known as a dominant strategy.” He said ANG-3777 could be the first treatment for delayed graft function, adding that “We’re not pre-treating patients; we’re treating patients who have had transplants and their kidneys are not functioning right. “

Participants who demonstrated signs and symptoms of delayed graft function were randomized to either placebo or ANG-3777 by IV infusion (first dose given 24 to 36 hours after transplant).

Researchers found patients taking ANG-3777 were nearly twice as likely to achieve the primary outcome of 1200 cc of urine output per day by day 28 (79% vs. 44% of those taking placebo). Furthermore, researchers observed improvements in urine output by day 2 in those in the ANG-3777 group.

In addition, by day 14, there was a 13-point difference in eGFR between the two groups (favoring ANG-3777) that was maintained throughout the study period.

Mayne said that although this was a small study, it is important to note that two graft failures occurred in the placebo group vs. none in ANG-3777 group.

“For a number of reasons, nephrologists and transplant surgeons are afraid of taking kidneys that are less than perfect,” he said. “There is a huge number of wasted kidneys in the United States. Treatment with ANG-3777 may have the potential to increase the amount of organs that get transplanted.” – by Melissa J. Webb

Reference:

Bromberg J, et al. Abstract TH-PO1213. Presented at: ASN Kidney Week; Nov. 7-10, 2019; Washington D.C.

Disclosure: Mayne reports being an employee of Angion Biomedica.

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