Meeting News Coverage

No significant difference in long-term technique failure found for urgent- vs conventional-start peritoneal dialysis

AUSTIN, Texas — A study presented at the National Kidney Foundation Spring Clinical Meetings showed no significant difference between urgent-start and conventional-start peritoneal dialysis when it came to long-term technique failure.

“We gathered data from about 159 patients who started peritoneal dialysis from 2010 to 2017, and we defined technique failure as switching from peritoneal dialysis to hemodialysis within at least 30 days,” Apameh Salari, MD, of the University of Southern California, told Healio Nephrology. “Our analysis showed the rate of technique failure for urgent-start peritoneal dialysis is 0.118 case per person per year and for conventional peritoneal dialysis 0.085 cases per person per years, which is low for two groups.”

According to the abstract for the single-center study, the prevalence of diabetes was 56% in the urgent-start peritoneal dialysis (USPD) group and was 59.6% in conventional-start peritoneal dialysis group. A total of 40 patients transferred to hemodialysis during the study period.

Study limitations included that reasons for technique failure were not available at the time of publication. Future studies should focus on determining preventable causes of technique failure in USPD, the authors noted. – by Jake Scott and Kristine Houck, MA, ELS

 

Reference:

Salari A, et al. Poster 302. Presented at: National Kidney Foundation Spring Clinical Meetings; April 10-14, 2018; Austin, Texas.

 

Disclosure: Salari reports no relevant financial disclosures.

AUSTIN, Texas — A study presented at the National Kidney Foundation Spring Clinical Meetings showed no significant difference between urgent-start and conventional-start peritoneal dialysis when it came to long-term technique failure.

“We gathered data from about 159 patients who started peritoneal dialysis from 2010 to 2017, and we defined technique failure as switching from peritoneal dialysis to hemodialysis within at least 30 days,” Apameh Salari, MD, of the University of Southern California, told Healio Nephrology. “Our analysis showed the rate of technique failure for urgent-start peritoneal dialysis is 0.118 case per person per year and for conventional peritoneal dialysis 0.085 cases per person per years, which is low for two groups.”

According to the abstract for the single-center study, the prevalence of diabetes was 56% in the urgent-start peritoneal dialysis (USPD) group and was 59.6% in conventional-start peritoneal dialysis group. A total of 40 patients transferred to hemodialysis during the study period.

Study limitations included that reasons for technique failure were not available at the time of publication. Future studies should focus on determining preventable causes of technique failure in USPD, the authors noted. – by Jake Scott and Kristine Houck, MA, ELS

 

Reference:

Salari A, et al. Poster 302. Presented at: National Kidney Foundation Spring Clinical Meetings; April 10-14, 2018; Austin, Texas.

 

Disclosure: Salari reports no relevant financial disclosures.

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