Jackson to retire as Northwest Kidney Centers CEO

Joyce F. Jackson

Joyce F. Jackson, president and CEO of Northwest Kidney Centers, will retire from her position after a successor is found, the company announced.

Jackson informed the Northwest Kidney Centers (NKC) board of trustees last year of her intention to retire, the company said in a press release. The board has engaged a national firm to conduct a search for the next CEO.

When Jackson joined the company in 1998, NKC had just opened its eighth dialysis clinic. Next year, its 20th clinic will open. During her tenure, the organization’s annual patient services revenue has grown from $32 million to $131 million, and fundraising revenue has grown from $200,000 to $3 million, the company said.

“It has been an honor and privilege to serve as CEO of the world’s first dialysis program and one of the few nonprofit providers in our field,” Jackson said. “We have a proud history but, more importantly, we are evolving and changing with the times to be strong and relevant for the future.”

Last year, the organization’s 750 employees provided 276,500 dialysis treatments in clinics, local hospitals and patients’ homes, the company said.

Jackson led the effort to establish the Kidney Research Institute, a collaboration between NKC and University of Washington Medicine, and spurred NKC to provide a grant that launched the Center for Dialysis Innovation.

Reference:

www.nwkidney.org

Joyce F. Jackson

Joyce F. Jackson, president and CEO of Northwest Kidney Centers, will retire from her position after a successor is found, the company announced.

Jackson informed the Northwest Kidney Centers (NKC) board of trustees last year of her intention to retire, the company said in a press release. The board has engaged a national firm to conduct a search for the next CEO.

When Jackson joined the company in 1998, NKC had just opened its eighth dialysis clinic. Next year, its 20th clinic will open. During her tenure, the organization’s annual patient services revenue has grown from $32 million to $131 million, and fundraising revenue has grown from $200,000 to $3 million, the company said.

“It has been an honor and privilege to serve as CEO of the world’s first dialysis program and one of the few nonprofit providers in our field,” Jackson said. “We have a proud history but, more importantly, we are evolving and changing with the times to be strong and relevant for the future.”

Last year, the organization’s 750 employees provided 276,500 dialysis treatments in clinics, local hospitals and patients’ homes, the company said.

Jackson led the effort to establish the Kidney Research Institute, a collaboration between NKC and University of Washington Medicine, and spurred NKC to provide a grant that launched the Center for Dialysis Innovation.

Reference:

www.nwkidney.org