Phase 2 of KidneyX: Redesign Dialysis competition launched

The American Society of Nephrology and HHS launched the second phase of KidneyX: Redesign Dialysis, a prize competition aimed toward transforming kidney care.

Phase 2 of the competition aims to find prototype solutions that replicate normal kidney function and improve dialysis access. The prototypes submitted should address blood filtration, electrolyte homeostasis, volume regulation, toxin removal and secretion, filtrate drainage and connectivity or dialysis access.

“Dialysis treatment has not changed substantially since it was first introduced over 60 years ago,” Ed Simcox, HHS chief technology officer, said in a press release. “The pace of innovation in kidney care is unacceptable. Through KidneyX, we are creating a clear path for disruptive innovation in a $114 billion market.”

The competition asks for researchers, innovators, patients and investors with expertise in relevant areas to submit solutions by Jan. 31, 2020, for a chance to receive the award of $500,000.

“We were thrilled to see the enthusiastic response to Redesign Dialysis phase 1 from innovators across a spectrum of disciplines,” John Sedor, MD, KidneyX Steering Committee chair, said in the release. “We’re building a strong community dedicated to developing breakthrough solutions that will change outcomes and transform patients’ lives.”

The next competition by KidneyX, the Artificial Kidney Prize, will launch in April 2020 with a length of 4 years. The aim for this competition is to advance the development of an artificial kidney to replace physiological kidney function to sustain life and improve patient quality of life.

The American Society of Nephrology and HHS launched the second phase of KidneyX: Redesign Dialysis, a prize competition aimed toward transforming kidney care.

Phase 2 of the competition aims to find prototype solutions that replicate normal kidney function and improve dialysis access. The prototypes submitted should address blood filtration, electrolyte homeostasis, volume regulation, toxin removal and secretion, filtrate drainage and connectivity or dialysis access.

“Dialysis treatment has not changed substantially since it was first introduced over 60 years ago,” Ed Simcox, HHS chief technology officer, said in a press release. “The pace of innovation in kidney care is unacceptable. Through KidneyX, we are creating a clear path for disruptive innovation in a $114 billion market.”

The competition asks for researchers, innovators, patients and investors with expertise in relevant areas to submit solutions by Jan. 31, 2020, for a chance to receive the award of $500,000.

“We were thrilled to see the enthusiastic response to Redesign Dialysis phase 1 from innovators across a spectrum of disciplines,” John Sedor, MD, KidneyX Steering Committee chair, said in the release. “We’re building a strong community dedicated to developing breakthrough solutions that will change outcomes and transform patients’ lives.”

The next competition by KidneyX, the Artificial Kidney Prize, will launch in April 2020 with a length of 4 years. The aim for this competition is to advance the development of an artificial kidney to replace physiological kidney function to sustain life and improve patient quality of life.