Meeting News

No differences in blood pressure changes seen between patients on standard hemodialysis vs post-dilution hemodiafiltration

Paul A. Rootjes ASN photo
Paul A. Rootjes

SAN DIEGO — According to data presented at ASN Kidney Week 2018, researchers observed the mean pre- and post-dialysis systolic blood pressure, diastolic BP and mean arterial pressure in patients on standard hemodialysis and post-dilution hemodiafiltration all decreased over time. Pulse pressure, however, increased and there were no observable differences between the standard hemodialysis and post-dilution hemodiafiltration groups.

“In the last couple of years, some European studies have been published that compared cost solution hemodiafiltration (HDF) with a standard hemodialysis. When we pooled all the data, we saw there were survival benefits in the high-volume HDF group, especially in high-volume post-dilution HDF,” Paul A. Rootjes, from VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam, Netherlands, said during his presentation. “So, what we did here is we tried to look back in all the raw data from those studies and look to all the blood pressures they had collected.”

Researchers pooled the individual participant data of 906 patients from the Estudio de Supervivencia de Hemodiafiltración, 714 from the Dutch Convective Transport Study and 391 from the French HDF study. Complete follow-up data were available for 1,613 patients. After gathering additional data, investigators had data for 2,006 patients in their meta-analysis. BP measurements were available every 3 months and changes during the course of 2 years were analyzed using linear mixed models.

“We looked at the how the long-term course of the blood pressure was before and after dialysis and we compared that for the HDF group and for the standard hemodialysis group altogether just to look for a difference in the course of the blood pressure in 2 years between HDF and standard hemodialysis,” Rootjes said. “What we actually found was that there was no difference between HDF and standard hemodialysis.” – by Kristine Houck, MA, ELS, and Scott Buzby

 

Reference:

Rootjes PA, et al. Abstract SA-PO871. Presented at: ASN Kidney Week; Oct. 23-28, 2018; San Diego.

 

Disclosure: Rootjes reports no outside funding for this study.

Paul A. Rootjes ASN photo
Paul A. Rootjes

SAN DIEGO — According to data presented at ASN Kidney Week 2018, researchers observed the mean pre- and post-dialysis systolic blood pressure, diastolic BP and mean arterial pressure in patients on standard hemodialysis and post-dilution hemodiafiltration all decreased over time. Pulse pressure, however, increased and there were no observable differences between the standard hemodialysis and post-dilution hemodiafiltration groups.

“In the last couple of years, some European studies have been published that compared cost solution hemodiafiltration (HDF) with a standard hemodialysis. When we pooled all the data, we saw there were survival benefits in the high-volume HDF group, especially in high-volume post-dilution HDF,” Paul A. Rootjes, from VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam, Netherlands, said during his presentation. “So, what we did here is we tried to look back in all the raw data from those studies and look to all the blood pressures they had collected.”

Researchers pooled the individual participant data of 906 patients from the Estudio de Supervivencia de Hemodiafiltración, 714 from the Dutch Convective Transport Study and 391 from the French HDF study. Complete follow-up data were available for 1,613 patients. After gathering additional data, investigators had data for 2,006 patients in their meta-analysis. BP measurements were available every 3 months and changes during the course of 2 years were analyzed using linear mixed models.

“We looked at the how the long-term course of the blood pressure was before and after dialysis and we compared that for the HDF group and for the standard hemodialysis group altogether just to look for a difference in the course of the blood pressure in 2 years between HDF and standard hemodialysis,” Rootjes said. “What we actually found was that there was no difference between HDF and standard hemodialysis.” – by Kristine Houck, MA, ELS, and Scott Buzby

 

Reference:

Rootjes PA, et al. Abstract SA-PO871. Presented at: ASN Kidney Week; Oct. 23-28, 2018; San Diego.

 

Disclosure: Rootjes reports no outside funding for this study.

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