In the Journals

High consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages linked with increased risk for CKD

Casey Rebholz
Casey M. Rebholz

Higher consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages among African-Americans in a community-based cohort correlated with an increased risk for subsequent chronic kidney disease, according to recently published data.

“A unique aspect of our study was that we identified patterns of beverage consumption using a statistical method called principal components analysis,” Casey M. Rebholz, PhD, MS, MNSP, MPH, FAHA, told Healio/Nephrology. “This approach better reflects dietary behavior by capturing groups of beverages that are typically consumed instead of singling out individual beverages. Future research might consider taking a more holistic approach to beverage intake, which is an important component of the overall diet.”

Researchers performed a prospective analysis of the Jackson Heart Study and assessed the beverage intake with a food frequency questionnaire that was administered at baseline to 3,003 African-American participants with normal kidney function from Jackson, Mississippi. Investigators defined incident CKD as an onset of eGFR less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m² and a decline of 30% eGFR or more relative to the baseline among participants with a baseline eGFR of 60 mL/min/1.73 m² or more. The association between the consumption of each individual beverage, beverage patterns and incident CKD was estimated with logistic regression. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to derive beverage patterns in which components were developed based on linear combinations of beverages consumed.

 
Higher consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages among African-Americans in a community-based cohort correlated with an increased risk for subsequent CKD.
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Results showed that 185 participants developed incident CKD over a median follow-up of 8 years. The mean eGFR was 98 mL/min/1.73 m2. Investigators noted after the adjustment of total energy intake, age, sex, education, BMI, smoking, physical activity, hypertension, diabetes, HDL, LDL, history of cardiovascular disease, and baseline eGFR, a PCA-derived beverage pattern consisting of higher consumption of soda, sweetened fruit drinks, and water correlated with a significant increase in incident CKD.

“Our study extends previous research on the adverse cardiometabolic health consequences of sugar-sweetened beverages to show that they also increase the risk of developing kidney disease,” Rebholz said. “These findings provide further support for dietary guidelines that recommend limiting intake of sugar-sweetened beverages, such as soda and sweetened fruit drinks.”– by Monica Jaramillo

 

Disclosures : Rebholz reports she is supported by a mentored research scientist development award from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (K01 DK107782). Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

Casey Rebholz
Casey M. Rebholz

Higher consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages among African-Americans in a community-based cohort correlated with an increased risk for subsequent chronic kidney disease, according to recently published data.

“A unique aspect of our study was that we identified patterns of beverage consumption using a statistical method called principal components analysis,” Casey M. Rebholz, PhD, MS, MNSP, MPH, FAHA, told Healio/Nephrology. “This approach better reflects dietary behavior by capturing groups of beverages that are typically consumed instead of singling out individual beverages. Future research might consider taking a more holistic approach to beverage intake, which is an important component of the overall diet.”

Researchers performed a prospective analysis of the Jackson Heart Study and assessed the beverage intake with a food frequency questionnaire that was administered at baseline to 3,003 African-American participants with normal kidney function from Jackson, Mississippi. Investigators defined incident CKD as an onset of eGFR less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m² and a decline of 30% eGFR or more relative to the baseline among participants with a baseline eGFR of 60 mL/min/1.73 m² or more. The association between the consumption of each individual beverage, beverage patterns and incident CKD was estimated with logistic regression. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to derive beverage patterns in which components were developed based on linear combinations of beverages consumed.

 
Higher consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages among African-Americans in a community-based cohort correlated with an increased risk for subsequent CKD.
Adobe Stock

Results showed that 185 participants developed incident CKD over a median follow-up of 8 years. The mean eGFR was 98 mL/min/1.73 m2. Investigators noted after the adjustment of total energy intake, age, sex, education, BMI, smoking, physical activity, hypertension, diabetes, HDL, LDL, history of cardiovascular disease, and baseline eGFR, a PCA-derived beverage pattern consisting of higher consumption of soda, sweetened fruit drinks, and water correlated with a significant increase in incident CKD.

“Our study extends previous research on the adverse cardiometabolic health consequences of sugar-sweetened beverages to show that they also increase the risk of developing kidney disease,” Rebholz said. “These findings provide further support for dietary guidelines that recommend limiting intake of sugar-sweetened beverages, such as soda and sweetened fruit drinks.”– by Monica Jaramillo

 

Disclosures : Rebholz reports she is supported by a mentored research scientist development award from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (K01 DK107782). Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.