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Study analyzes strategies to prevent AKI, dialysis-required AKI in patients with HIV

LAS VEGAS — Acute kidney injury is a common complication of hospitalized patients with HIV and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. According to a poster presented at the American Nephrology Nurses Association National Symposium, it is important for nurses to think critically when providing care to these patients to minimize the risk of acute kidney injury and prevent complications linked with dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury.

Jami Brown

“In caring for patients with HIV, it is imperative that nurses understand the pathophysiology and etiology of AKI in identifying patients at risk,” study author Jami S. Brown, DHEd, RN, CNN, of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, told Healio Nephrology. “Therefore, nurses and other members of the inter-professional team must be knowledgeable of the patient’s medical history (eg, diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease), manage the acute illness, monitor the labs and circulation, and monitor the potential causes (eg, volume depletion, sepsis, administration of nephrotoxic medications and radiocontrast dye) to prevent AKI and dialysis-requiring AKI.”

According to one study of patients with HIV, the most common causes of AKI were sepsis, nephrotoxic drug administration, volume depletion and radiocontrast use. Incidence of AKI and dialysis-requiring AKI in patients with HIV were also associated with age, severity of acute illness and chronic comorbidities. – by Jake Scott

 

Reference:

Brown JS. Strategies to prevent acute kidney injury and dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury in patients with HIV. Presented at: American Nephrology Nurses Association National Symposium; April 15-18, 2018; Las Vegas.

 

Disclosure: Brown reports no relevant financial disclosures.

LAS VEGAS — Acute kidney injury is a common complication of hospitalized patients with HIV and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. According to a poster presented at the American Nephrology Nurses Association National Symposium, it is important for nurses to think critically when providing care to these patients to minimize the risk of acute kidney injury and prevent complications linked with dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury.

Jami Brown

“In caring for patients with HIV, it is imperative that nurses understand the pathophysiology and etiology of AKI in identifying patients at risk,” study author Jami S. Brown, DHEd, RN, CNN, of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, told Healio Nephrology. “Therefore, nurses and other members of the inter-professional team must be knowledgeable of the patient’s medical history (eg, diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease), manage the acute illness, monitor the labs and circulation, and monitor the potential causes (eg, volume depletion, sepsis, administration of nephrotoxic medications and radiocontrast dye) to prevent AKI and dialysis-requiring AKI.”

According to one study of patients with HIV, the most common causes of AKI were sepsis, nephrotoxic drug administration, volume depletion and radiocontrast use. Incidence of AKI and dialysis-requiring AKI in patients with HIV were also associated with age, severity of acute illness and chronic comorbidities. – by Jake Scott

 

Reference:

Brown JS. Strategies to prevent acute kidney injury and dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury in patients with HIV. Presented at: American Nephrology Nurses Association National Symposium; April 15-18, 2018; Las Vegas.

 

Disclosure: Brown reports no relevant financial disclosures.

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