Psychiatric Annals

CME Article 

Evidence-based Psychosocial Treatments for Childhood ADHD

Nina M. Kaiser, PhD; Linda J. Pfiffner, PhD

Abstract

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is one of the most frequently diagnosed disorders of childhood and is a frequent reason for referral to child psychiatrists and psychologists and pediatricians. Core ADHD symptoms of inattention and/or hyperactivity/impulsivity translate into significant functional impairments at school, at home, and with peers. Psychosocial treatments have been developed specifically to address these impairments across settings and, after having garnered support in numerous research studies, now are considered to be “evidence-based treatments” for ADHD.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Nina M. Kaiser, PhD; and Linda J. Pfiffner, PhD, are with the Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco.

Address correspondence to: Nina M. Kaiser, PhD or Linda J. Pfiffner, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco; 401 Parnassus Avenue, Box 0984-CAS, San Francisco, CA 94143-0984; fax: (415) 476-7163; e-mail: lindap@lppi.ucsf.edu.

Dr. Kaiser and Dr. Pfiffner have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Review evidence-based psychosocial interventions for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
  2. Summarize existing research supporting behavioral and child skills training approaches to treating childhood ADHD.
  3. Describe guidelines for referral to and collaboration with psychosocial treatment providers.

Abstract

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is one of the most frequently diagnosed disorders of childhood and is a frequent reason for referral to child psychiatrists and psychologists and pediatricians. Core ADHD symptoms of inattention and/or hyperactivity/impulsivity translate into significant functional impairments at school, at home, and with peers. Psychosocial treatments have been developed specifically to address these impairments across settings and, after having garnered support in numerous research studies, now are considered to be “evidence-based treatments” for ADHD.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Nina M. Kaiser, PhD; and Linda J. Pfiffner, PhD, are with the Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco.

Address correspondence to: Nina M. Kaiser, PhD or Linda J. Pfiffner, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco; 401 Parnassus Avenue, Box 0984-CAS, San Francisco, CA 94143-0984; fax: (415) 476-7163; e-mail: lindap@lppi.ucsf.edu.

Dr. Kaiser and Dr. Pfiffner have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Review evidence-based psychosocial interventions for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
  2. Summarize existing research supporting behavioral and child skills training approaches to treating childhood ADHD.
  3. Describe guidelines for referral to and collaboration with psychosocial treatment providers.

10.3928/00485713-20101221-03

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