Psychiatric Annals

CME Article 

The Struggle for DOD/VA Benefits

Harold M. Ginzburg, MD, JD, MPH; Kristie D. Holm, JD, LMM

Abstract

The military and, if necessary, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), should provide necessary medical care and treatment for service members injured in the line of duty. Necessary care and treatment includes medical, psychological, emotional, and financial support, which is dependent on the nature and extent of the injuries and the residual disability. Although the VA’s mantra is “To Care for Him Who Hath Borne the Battle, and His Widow and His Orphan,” today’s veterans return to their families only to find that the battle has just begun, albeit in another theater on home soil. To obtain adequate physical, mental, and emotional care, even the country’s most ill-equipped and disabled veterans must run the gauntlet of the administrative and federal court system.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Harold M. Ginzburg, MD, JD, MPH, is in the private practice of psychiatry and is Clinical Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Neurology, Tulane University Health Sciences Center; Clinical Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center; and Adjunct Clinical Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences School of Medicine. Kristie D. Holm, JD, LLM, is associated with the Becnel Law Firm, LLC, Reserve, Louisiana, and specializes in the area of class-action litigation.

Address correspondence to: Harold M. Ginzburg, MD, Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, Suite 200, 3340 Severn Avenue, Metairie, LA 70002; fax 504-613-4913; or e-mail haroldginzburg@hotmail.com.

Dr. Ginzburg and Ms. Holm have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Identify barriers to access to care for returning veterans.
  2. Identify non-traditional remedies used to improve access to financial and healthcare benefits.
  3. Identify the benefits of a class action approach to resolving access-to-care issues.

Abstract

The military and, if necessary, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), should provide necessary medical care and treatment for service members injured in the line of duty. Necessary care and treatment includes medical, psychological, emotional, and financial support, which is dependent on the nature and extent of the injuries and the residual disability. Although the VA’s mantra is “To Care for Him Who Hath Borne the Battle, and His Widow and His Orphan,” today’s veterans return to their families only to find that the battle has just begun, albeit in another theater on home soil. To obtain adequate physical, mental, and emotional care, even the country’s most ill-equipped and disabled veterans must run the gauntlet of the administrative and federal court system.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Harold M. Ginzburg, MD, JD, MPH, is in the private practice of psychiatry and is Clinical Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Neurology, Tulane University Health Sciences Center; Clinical Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center; and Adjunct Clinical Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences School of Medicine. Kristie D. Holm, JD, LLM, is associated with the Becnel Law Firm, LLC, Reserve, Louisiana, and specializes in the area of class-action litigation.

Address correspondence to: Harold M. Ginzburg, MD, Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, Suite 200, 3340 Severn Avenue, Metairie, LA 70002; fax 504-613-4913; or e-mail haroldginzburg@hotmail.com.

Dr. Ginzburg and Ms. Holm have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Identify barriers to access to care for returning veterans.
  2. Identify non-traditional remedies used to improve access to financial and healthcare benefits.
  3. Identify the benefits of a class action approach to resolving access-to-care issues.

10.3928/00485713-20090201-02

Sign up to receive

Journal E-contents