Psychiatric Annals

Feature Article 

Vermont: A Case History for Supporting National Guard Troops and Their Families

Laurie B. Slone, PhD; Andrew S. Pomerantz, MD; Matthew J. Friedman, MD, PhD

Abstract

The current wars in Afghanistan and Iraq present many challenges to service members and their families. The traditional military cycle of deployment exposes troops and their families to the tension and apprehension of predeployment anticipation; troops to the dangers of the war zone; families to the challenge of carrying on without the missing service member; and, finally, troops and their families with post-deployment reintegration. The reunion and reintegration phase can be especially problematic because the effects of deployment are complicated by the difficulty of picking up where things left off before their separation.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Laurie B. Slone, PhD, and Matthew H. Friedman, MD, PhD, are with the National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs; and the Department of Psychiatry, Dartmouth Medical School. Andrew S. Pomerantz, MD, is with VA Medical Center, White River Junction, Vermont; and the Department of Psychiatry, Dartmouth Medical School.

Address correspondence to: Laurie Slone, PhD, 215 N. Main Street, 116-D, VA Medical Center, White River Junction, VT 05009; fax 802-295-5135; or e-mail Laurie.Slone@dartmouth.edu.

Dr. Slone and Dr. Pomerantz have disclosed no relevant financial relationships. Dr. Friedman has disclosed the following relevant financial relationship: AstraZeneca: Member of Speakers’ Bureau.

Abstract

The current wars in Afghanistan and Iraq present many challenges to service members and their families. The traditional military cycle of deployment exposes troops and their families to the tension and apprehension of predeployment anticipation; troops to the dangers of the war zone; families to the challenge of carrying on without the missing service member; and, finally, troops and their families with post-deployment reintegration. The reunion and reintegration phase can be especially problematic because the effects of deployment are complicated by the difficulty of picking up where things left off before their separation.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Laurie B. Slone, PhD, and Matthew H. Friedman, MD, PhD, are with the National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs; and the Department of Psychiatry, Dartmouth Medical School. Andrew S. Pomerantz, MD, is with VA Medical Center, White River Junction, Vermont; and the Department of Psychiatry, Dartmouth Medical School.

Address correspondence to: Laurie Slone, PhD, 215 N. Main Street, 116-D, VA Medical Center, White River Junction, VT 05009; fax 802-295-5135; or e-mail Laurie.Slone@dartmouth.edu.

Dr. Slone and Dr. Pomerantz have disclosed no relevant financial relationships. Dr. Friedman has disclosed the following relevant financial relationship: AstraZeneca: Member of Speakers’ Bureau.

10.3928/00485713-20090201-10

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