Psychiatric Annals

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CME Article 

Insomnia and Psychiatric Disorders

Michael J. Peterson, MD, PhD; Meredith E. Rumble, PhD; Ruth M. Benca, MD, PhD

Abstract

Insomnia and psychiatric disorders frequently occur together. Epidemiological studies have revealed that individuals with insomnia are more likely to have clinically significant psychological symptoms in comparison with individuals without insomnia. For example, a recent population survey indicated that adults with insomnia were up to nine times more likely to have clinically significant depressive symptoms and were up to 17 times more likely to have clinically significant anxiety symptoms than those without insomnia. Epidemiological studies also have demonstrated that approximately 25% to 50% of individuals with clinically significant insomnia meet criteria for insomnia that is comorbid with a psychiatric disorder, including mood and anxiety disorders and have an increased lifetime prevalence of major depressive and anxiety disorders. Furthermore, in samples of patients from sleep clinics, this rate was even higher — more than 75% of patients with insomnia also met criteria for a psychiatric disorder. In general, sleep disruption is one of the most common and consistent symptoms of psychiatric disorders, and is included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition, text revision, (DSM-IV-TR) diagnostic criteria for depression, mania and hypomania, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD).

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Michael J. Peterson, MD, PhD, is Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Meredith E. Rumble, PhD, is Research Associate, Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Ruth M. Benca, MD, PhD, is Professor, Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Director, University of Wisconsin Sleep Program.

Address correspondence to: Michael J. Peterson, MD, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 6001 Research Park Blvd., Madison, WI 53719; fax (608) 263-0265; or e-mail mpeterson2@wisc.edu.

Dr. Peterson has disclosed no relevant financial relationships. Dr. Rumble has disclosed no relevant financial relationships. Dr. Benca has disclosed the following relevant financial relationships: Actekion, Sanofi-Aventis, Sepracor, and Takeda: Consultant.

This study was supported by a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Roadmap Interdisciplinary Award T32 MH75880 (MJP) and a National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression (NARSAD) Young Investigator Award (MJP).

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Discuss the biological mechanisms shard by sleep and mood disorders.
  2. Summarize the nature of sleep abnormalities in different psychiatric disorders.
  3. Describe the relation of insomnia and psychiatric disorders

Abstract

Insomnia and psychiatric disorders frequently occur together. Epidemiological studies have revealed that individuals with insomnia are more likely to have clinically significant psychological symptoms in comparison with individuals without insomnia. For example, a recent population survey indicated that adults with insomnia were up to nine times more likely to have clinically significant depressive symptoms and were up to 17 times more likely to have clinically significant anxiety symptoms than those without insomnia. Epidemiological studies also have demonstrated that approximately 25% to 50% of individuals with clinically significant insomnia meet criteria for insomnia that is comorbid with a psychiatric disorder, including mood and anxiety disorders and have an increased lifetime prevalence of major depressive and anxiety disorders. Furthermore, in samples of patients from sleep clinics, this rate was even higher — more than 75% of patients with insomnia also met criteria for a psychiatric disorder. In general, sleep disruption is one of the most common and consistent symptoms of psychiatric disorders, and is included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition, text revision, (DSM-IV-TR) diagnostic criteria for depression, mania and hypomania, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD).

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Michael J. Peterson, MD, PhD, is Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Meredith E. Rumble, PhD, is Research Associate, Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Ruth M. Benca, MD, PhD, is Professor, Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Director, University of Wisconsin Sleep Program.

Address correspondence to: Michael J. Peterson, MD, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 6001 Research Park Blvd., Madison, WI 53719; fax (608) 263-0265; or e-mail mpeterson2@wisc.edu.

Dr. Peterson has disclosed no relevant financial relationships. Dr. Rumble has disclosed no relevant financial relationships. Dr. Benca has disclosed the following relevant financial relationships: Actekion, Sanofi-Aventis, Sepracor, and Takeda: Consultant.

This study was supported by a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Roadmap Interdisciplinary Award T32 MH75880 (MJP) and a National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression (NARSAD) Young Investigator Award (MJP).

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Discuss the biological mechanisms shard by sleep and mood disorders.
  2. Summarize the nature of sleep abnormalities in different psychiatric disorders.
  3. Describe the relation of insomnia and psychiatric disorders

Insomnia and psychiatric disorders frequently occur together. Epidemiological studies have revealed that individuals with insomnia are more likely to have clinically significant psychological symptoms in comparison with individuals without insomnia. For example, a recent population survey indicated that adults with insomnia were up to nine times more likely to have clinically significant depressive symptoms and were up to 17 times more likely to have clinically significant anxiety symptoms than those without insomnia. Epidemiological studies also have demonstrated that approximately 25% to 50% of individuals with clinically significant insomnia meet criteria for insomnia that is comorbid with a psychiatric disorder, including mood and anxiety disorders and have an increased lifetime prevalence of major depressive and anxiety disorders. Furthermore, in samples of patients from sleep clinics, this rate was even higher — more than 75% of patients with insomnia also met criteria for a psychiatric disorder. In general, sleep disruption is one of the most common and consistent symptoms of psychiatric disorders, and is included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition, text revision, (DSM-IV-TR) diagnostic criteria for depression, mania and hypomania, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD).

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Michael J. Peterson, MD, PhD, is Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Meredith E. Rumble, PhD, is Research Associate, Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Ruth M. Benca, MD, PhD, is Professor, Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Director, University of Wisconsin Sleep Program.

Address correspondence to: Michael J. Peterson, MD, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 6001 Research Park Blvd., Madison, WI 53719; fax (608) 263-0265; or e-mail mpeterson2@wisc.edu.

Dr. Peterson has disclosed no relevant financial relationships. Dr. Rumble has disclosed no relevant financial relationships. Dr. Benca has disclosed the following relevant financial relationships: Actekion, Sanofi-Aventis, Sepracor, and Takeda: Consultant.

This study was supported by a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Roadmap Interdisciplinary Award T32 MH75880 (MJP) and a National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression (NARSAD) Young Investigator Award (MJP).

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Discuss the biological mechanisms shard by sleep and mood disorders.
  2. Summarize the nature of sleep abnormalities in different psychiatric disorders.
  3. Describe the relation of insomnia and psychiatric disorders

10.3928/00485713-20080901-07

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