Psychiatric Annals

Feature Article 

Traumatic Bereavement in War Veterans

Anthony Papa, PhD; Yuval Neria, PhD; Brett Litz, PhD

Abstract

Anthony Papa, PhD; Yuval Neria, PhD; and Brett Litz, PhD

More than a million men and women have been deployed to Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) since the beginning of these conflicts. Recent studies show that loss of fellow service members to death or debilitating injuries is a major hazard. Hoge and colleagues reported that 68% of service members saw dead or seriously injured Americans, and 86% knew someone who was seriously injured or killed. The majority of these service members will not develop lasting mental health problems as a result of the dual burden of loss and exposure to potentially traumatic events, but a salient minority will develop persistent problems.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Anthony Papa, PhD, is with the University of Nevada, Reno. Yuval Neria, PhD, is with the N.Y. State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York. Brett Litz, PhD, is with the National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts.

Address correspondence to: Anthony Papa, PhD, University of Nevada, Reno, Department of Psychology/298, Reno, NV 89557; or e-mail apapa@unr.edu.

Dr. Papa, Dr. Neria, and Dr. Litz have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Abstract

Anthony Papa, PhD; Yuval Neria, PhD; and Brett Litz, PhD

More than a million men and women have been deployed to Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) since the beginning of these conflicts. Recent studies show that loss of fellow service members to death or debilitating injuries is a major hazard. Hoge and colleagues reported that 68% of service members saw dead or seriously injured Americans, and 86% knew someone who was seriously injured or killed. The majority of these service members will not develop lasting mental health problems as a result of the dual burden of loss and exposure to potentially traumatic events, but a salient minority will develop persistent problems.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Anthony Papa, PhD, is with the University of Nevada, Reno. Yuval Neria, PhD, is with the N.Y. State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York. Brett Litz, PhD, is with the National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts.

Address correspondence to: Anthony Papa, PhD, University of Nevada, Reno, Department of Psychology/298, Reno, NV 89557; or e-mail apapa@unr.edu.

Dr. Papa, Dr. Neria, and Dr. Litz have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Anthony Papa, PhD; Yuval Neria, PhD; and Brett Litz, PhD

More than a million men and women have been deployed to Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) since the beginning of these conflicts. Recent studies show that loss of fellow service members to death or debilitating injuries is a major hazard. Hoge and colleagues reported that 68% of service members saw dead or seriously injured Americans, and 86% knew someone who was seriously injured or killed. The majority of these service members will not develop lasting mental health problems as a result of the dual burden of loss and exposure to potentially traumatic events, but a salient minority will develop persistent problems.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Anthony Papa, PhD, is with the University of Nevada, Reno. Yuval Neria, PhD, is with the N.Y. State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York. Brett Litz, PhD, is with the National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts.

Address correspondence to: Anthony Papa, PhD, University of Nevada, Reno, Department of Psychology/298, Reno, NV 89557; or e-mail apapa@unr.edu.

Dr. Papa, Dr. Neria, and Dr. Litz have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

10.3928/00485713-20081001-07

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