Psychiatric Annals

Feature Articles 

Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology: Then, Now, and the Future

L. Eugene Arnold, MEd, MD

Abstract

It has been an educational pleasure reviewing and editing the six articles comprising this special issue. The progress in child and adolescent psychopharmacology in the past decade or two has been rapid, and it needed to be. Children had long been pharmacological research orphans, having few studies focusing on their needs. They had been given drugs for which safety and efficacy had been established in adults for the disorders in question (and sometimes for other disorders) without direct research demonstrating safety and efficacy in youth. It was becoming obvious that both effectiveness and side effects varied by age at a time when drug industry research on children was avoided because it was found to be too risky unless the drug was specifically for children.

ABOUT THE GUEST EDITOR

L. Eugene Arnold, MEd, MD, is a board-certified child and adolescent psychiatrist. He is Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry at Ohio State University (OSU), where he was formerly director of the division of child and adolescent psychiatry and vice-chair of psychiatry. He graduated from Ohio State University College of Medicine magna cum laude, interned at University of Oregon, took residencies at Johns Hopkins, where he earned the MEd, and served in the U.S. Public Health Service.

He is a co-investigator in the OSU Research Unit on Pediatric Psychopharmacology (RUPP). He has over 37 years’ experience in child psychiatric treatment research, including the multi-site National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Multimodal Treatment Study of Children with ADHD (“the MTA”), for which he continues as executive secretary and current chair of the steering committee. For his work on the MTA, he received the NIH Director’s Award. He has a particular interest in alternative and complementary treatments for ADHD. His publications include 9 books, more than 55 chapters, and more than 150 articles.

Abstract

It has been an educational pleasure reviewing and editing the six articles comprising this special issue. The progress in child and adolescent psychopharmacology in the past decade or two has been rapid, and it needed to be. Children had long been pharmacological research orphans, having few studies focusing on their needs. They had been given drugs for which safety and efficacy had been established in adults for the disorders in question (and sometimes for other disorders) without direct research demonstrating safety and efficacy in youth. It was becoming obvious that both effectiveness and side effects varied by age at a time when drug industry research on children was avoided because it was found to be too risky unless the drug was specifically for children.

ABOUT THE GUEST EDITOR

L. Eugene Arnold, MEd, MD, is a board-certified child and adolescent psychiatrist. He is Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry at Ohio State University (OSU), where he was formerly director of the division of child and adolescent psychiatry and vice-chair of psychiatry. He graduated from Ohio State University College of Medicine magna cum laude, interned at University of Oregon, took residencies at Johns Hopkins, where he earned the MEd, and served in the U.S. Public Health Service.

He is a co-investigator in the OSU Research Unit on Pediatric Psychopharmacology (RUPP). He has over 37 years’ experience in child psychiatric treatment research, including the multi-site National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Multimodal Treatment Study of Children with ADHD (“the MTA”), for which he continues as executive secretary and current chair of the steering committee. For his work on the MTA, he received the NIH Director’s Award. He has a particular interest in alternative and complementary treatments for ADHD. His publications include 9 books, more than 55 chapters, and more than 150 articles.

It has been an educational pleasure reviewing and editing the six articles comprising this special issue. The progress in child and adolescent psychopharmacology in the past decade or two has been rapid, and it needed to be. Children had long been pharmacological research orphans, having few studies focusing on their needs. They had been given drugs for which safety and efficacy had been established in adults for the disorders in question (and sometimes for other disorders) without direct research demonstrating safety and efficacy in youth. It was becoming obvious that both effectiveness and side effects varied by age at a time when drug industry research on children was avoided because it was found to be too risky unless the drug was specifically for children.

ABOUT THE GUEST EDITOR

L. Eugene Arnold, MEd, MD, is a board-certified child and adolescent psychiatrist. He is Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry at Ohio State University (OSU), where he was formerly director of the division of child and adolescent psychiatry and vice-chair of psychiatry. He graduated from Ohio State University College of Medicine magna cum laude, interned at University of Oregon, took residencies at Johns Hopkins, where he earned the MEd, and served in the U.S. Public Health Service.

He is a co-investigator in the OSU Research Unit on Pediatric Psychopharmacology (RUPP). He has over 37 years’ experience in child psychiatric treatment research, including the multi-site National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Multimodal Treatment Study of Children with ADHD (“the MTA”), for which he continues as executive secretary and current chair of the steering committee. For his work on the MTA, he received the NIH Director’s Award. He has a particular interest in alternative and complementary treatments for ADHD. His publications include 9 books, more than 55 chapters, and more than 150 articles.

10.3928/00485713-20070701-07

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