Psychiatric Annals

Feature Articles 

Catatonia as a Subtype of Schizophrenia

Thomas Stompe, MD; Kristina Ritter, MD; Hans Schanda, MD

Abstract

Following an historical overview of the development of the concept of catatonic schizophrenia, the impact of using different diagnostic criteria sets on the frequency of this subtype of schizophrenia will be described. This topic is not only of academic importance but also of clinical importance: the recognition of catatonic schizophrenia entails specific treatment options, including the use of benzodiazepines or electroconvulsive therapy.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Thomas Stompe, MD, is with the Psychiatric University Clinic Vienna, and the Justizanstalt Göllersdorf. Kristina Ritter, MD, is with the Psychiatric University Clinic Vienna. Hans Schanda, MD, is with the Psychiatric University Clinic Vienna, and the Justizanstalt Göllersdorf.

Address correspondence to: Thomas Stompe, MD, Psychiatric University Clinic Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna, Austria; fax +43 2954 2411 206; or email Thomas.stompe@chello.at.

The authors disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Review the history of the concept of catatonia.
  2. Examine the competing schools of thought about catatonic schizophrenia.
  3. Review the reasons for the decline in the diagnosis of catatonic schizophrenia.

Abstract

Following an historical overview of the development of the concept of catatonic schizophrenia, the impact of using different diagnostic criteria sets on the frequency of this subtype of schizophrenia will be described. This topic is not only of academic importance but also of clinical importance: the recognition of catatonic schizophrenia entails specific treatment options, including the use of benzodiazepines or electroconvulsive therapy.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Thomas Stompe, MD, is with the Psychiatric University Clinic Vienna, and the Justizanstalt Göllersdorf. Kristina Ritter, MD, is with the Psychiatric University Clinic Vienna. Hans Schanda, MD, is with the Psychiatric University Clinic Vienna, and the Justizanstalt Göllersdorf.

Address correspondence to: Thomas Stompe, MD, Psychiatric University Clinic Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna, Austria; fax +43 2954 2411 206; or email Thomas.stompe@chello.at.

The authors disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Review the history of the concept of catatonia.
  2. Examine the competing schools of thought about catatonic schizophrenia.
  3. Review the reasons for the decline in the diagnosis of catatonic schizophrenia.

Following an historical overview of the development of the concept of catatonic schizophrenia, the impact of using different diagnostic criteria sets on the frequency of this subtype of schizophrenia will be described. This topic is not only of academic importance but also of clinical importance: the recognition of catatonic schizophrenia entails specific treatment options, including the use of benzodiazepines or electroconvulsive therapy.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Thomas Stompe, MD, is with the Psychiatric University Clinic Vienna, and the Justizanstalt Göllersdorf. Kristina Ritter, MD, is with the Psychiatric University Clinic Vienna. Hans Schanda, MD, is with the Psychiatric University Clinic Vienna, and the Justizanstalt Göllersdorf.

Address correspondence to: Thomas Stompe, MD, Psychiatric University Clinic Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna, Austria; fax +43 2954 2411 206; or email Thomas.stompe@chello.at.

The authors disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Review the history of the concept of catatonia.
  2. Examine the competing schools of thought about catatonic schizophrenia.
  3. Review the reasons for the decline in the diagnosis of catatonic schizophrenia.

10.3928/00485713-20070101-04

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