Psychiatric Annals

The articles prior to January 2011 are part of the back file collection and are not available with a current paid subscription. To access the article, you may purchase it or purchase the complete back file collection here

Feature 

A Brief History of Interpersonal Psychotherapy

Myrna M. Weissman, PhD

  • Psychiatric Annals. 2006;36(8)
  • Posted August 1, 2006

Abstract

The story of interpersonal therapy (IPT) began in 1969 at Yale University, when Dr. Gerald Klerman was joined by Dr. Eugene Paykel from London to design a study to test the relative efficacy of a tricyclic antidepressant alone and both with and without psychotherapy as maintenance treatment of ambulatory nonbipolar depression. The evidence for the efficacy of tricyclic antidepressants for reducing the acute symptoms of depression was strong, yet the main treatment for depression at the time was psychodynamic psychotherapy. The few studies testing psychotherapy were behavioral treatments and were limited in scope and sample size. A manual for cognitive therapy (CT) was under development by Dr. Aaron Beck.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Weissman is professor of psychiatry and epidemiology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY, and chief, Division of Clinical and Genetic Epidemiology, New York State Psychiatric Institute.

Address reprint requests to: Myrna M. Weissman, PhD, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, 1051 Riverside Drive, Unit 24, New York, NY 10034; or e-mail mmw3@columbia.edu.

Dr. Weissman receives royalties from her books on IPT but disclosed no other relevant financial relationships.

Abstract

The story of interpersonal therapy (IPT) began in 1969 at Yale University, when Dr. Gerald Klerman was joined by Dr. Eugene Paykel from London to design a study to test the relative efficacy of a tricyclic antidepressant alone and both with and without psychotherapy as maintenance treatment of ambulatory nonbipolar depression. The evidence for the efficacy of tricyclic antidepressants for reducing the acute symptoms of depression was strong, yet the main treatment for depression at the time was psychodynamic psychotherapy. The few studies testing psychotherapy were behavioral treatments and were limited in scope and sample size. A manual for cognitive therapy (CT) was under development by Dr. Aaron Beck.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Weissman is professor of psychiatry and epidemiology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY, and chief, Division of Clinical and Genetic Epidemiology, New York State Psychiatric Institute.

Address reprint requests to: Myrna M. Weissman, PhD, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, 1051 Riverside Drive, Unit 24, New York, NY 10034; or e-mail mmw3@columbia.edu.

Dr. Weissman receives royalties from her books on IPT but disclosed no other relevant financial relationships.

The story of interpersonal therapy (IPT) began in 1969 at Yale University, when Dr. Gerald Klerman was joined by Dr. Eugene Paykel from London to design a study to test the relative efficacy of a tricyclic antidepressant alone and both with and without psychotherapy as maintenance treatment of ambulatory nonbipolar depression. The evidence for the efficacy of tricyclic antidepressants for reducing the acute symptoms of depression was strong, yet the main treatment for depression at the time was psychodynamic psychotherapy. The few studies testing psychotherapy were behavioral treatments and were limited in scope and sample size. A manual for cognitive therapy (CT) was under development by Dr. Aaron Beck.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Weissman is professor of psychiatry and epidemiology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY, and chief, Division of Clinical and Genetic Epidemiology, New York State Psychiatric Institute.

Address reprint requests to: Myrna M. Weissman, PhD, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, 1051 Riverside Drive, Unit 24, New York, NY 10034; or e-mail mmw3@columbia.edu.

Dr. Weissman receives royalties from her books on IPT but disclosed no other relevant financial relationships.

Sign up to receive

Journal E-contents