Psychiatric Annals

Feature 

Interpersonal Psychotherapy: Effectiveness Trials in Rural Uganda and New York City

Kathleen F. Clougherty, LCSW; Helen Verdeli, PhD; Laura H. Mufson, PhD; Jami F. Young, PhD

Abstract

During the past 2 decades, attention in psychotherapy research has shifted to transporting controlled studies of efficacious interventions into studies of these interventions in real world settings. Typically, these effectiveness studies include patients who do not need to meet extensive exclusion criteria, are treated by community clinicians, and are assessed with clinical as well as functional and consumer-based outcome measures. With rates of depression throughout the world on the rise, the need to find effective and feasible psychotherapy approaches for its treatment is imperative. While interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) has been proven efficacious in many research protocols conducted in academic settings, there is a dearth of clinical trials in community settings.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Ms. Clougherty is senior consulting trainer and supervisor, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY 10032. Dr. Verdeli is assistant professor, Clinical Psychology, Teachers College, Columbia University, and adjunct assistant professor, Clinical Psychology in Psychiatry, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York. Dr. Mufson is associate professor, Clinical Psychology in Psychiatry, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and research scientist, New York State Psychiatric Institute. Dr. Young is assistant professor, Clinical Psychology in Psychiatry, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

Address reprint requests to: Kathleen F. Clougherty, New York State Psychiatric Institute, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10032; or e-mail kfcipt88@aol.com.

The authors disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Abstract

During the past 2 decades, attention in psychotherapy research has shifted to transporting controlled studies of efficacious interventions into studies of these interventions in real world settings. Typically, these effectiveness studies include patients who do not need to meet extensive exclusion criteria, are treated by community clinicians, and are assessed with clinical as well as functional and consumer-based outcome measures. With rates of depression throughout the world on the rise, the need to find effective and feasible psychotherapy approaches for its treatment is imperative. While interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) has been proven efficacious in many research protocols conducted in academic settings, there is a dearth of clinical trials in community settings.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Ms. Clougherty is senior consulting trainer and supervisor, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY 10032. Dr. Verdeli is assistant professor, Clinical Psychology, Teachers College, Columbia University, and adjunct assistant professor, Clinical Psychology in Psychiatry, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York. Dr. Mufson is associate professor, Clinical Psychology in Psychiatry, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and research scientist, New York State Psychiatric Institute. Dr. Young is assistant professor, Clinical Psychology in Psychiatry, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

Address reprint requests to: Kathleen F. Clougherty, New York State Psychiatric Institute, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10032; or e-mail kfcipt88@aol.com.

The authors disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

During the past 2 decades, attention in psychotherapy research has shifted to transporting controlled studies of efficacious interventions into studies of these interventions in real world settings. Typically, these effectiveness studies include patients who do not need to meet extensive exclusion criteria, are treated by community clinicians, and are assessed with clinical as well as functional and consumer-based outcome measures. With rates of depression throughout the world on the rise, the need to find effective and feasible psychotherapy approaches for its treatment is imperative. While interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) has been proven efficacious in many research protocols conducted in academic settings, there is a dearth of clinical trials in community settings.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Ms. Clougherty is senior consulting trainer and supervisor, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY 10032. Dr. Verdeli is assistant professor, Clinical Psychology, Teachers College, Columbia University, and adjunct assistant professor, Clinical Psychology in Psychiatry, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York. Dr. Mufson is associate professor, Clinical Psychology in Psychiatry, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and research scientist, New York State Psychiatric Institute. Dr. Young is assistant professor, Clinical Psychology in Psychiatry, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

Address reprint requests to: Kathleen F. Clougherty, New York State Psychiatric Institute, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10032; or e-mail kfcipt88@aol.com.

The authors disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

10.3928/00485713-20060801-04

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