Psychiatric Annals

Feature 

Psychodynamic Perspective on Combining Therapies

Michelle B. Riba, MD, MS; Allan Tasman, MD

Abstract

It is now common practice for psychiatrists to provide combined psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy. The other articles in this issue discuss the relative merits of either one clinician providing both the pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy (integrated treatment), or two or more clinicians providing the medication and therapy (split treatment). Other related topics include treating patients with certain types of diagnostic problems (eg, personality disorders); particular types of psychotherapies that have been used as combined treatments (eg, cognitive-behavior therapy); and sequencing of pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy (ie, whether they should be started at the same time or one before the other).

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Dr. Riba is clinical professor and associate chair, Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. Dr. Tasman is professor and chairman, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY.

Address reprint requests to: Allan Tasman, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292-0001; or e-mail allan.tasman@louisville.edu.

Abstract

It is now common practice for psychiatrists to provide combined psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy. The other articles in this issue discuss the relative merits of either one clinician providing both the pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy (integrated treatment), or two or more clinicians providing the medication and therapy (split treatment). Other related topics include treating patients with certain types of diagnostic problems (eg, personality disorders); particular types of psychotherapies that have been used as combined treatments (eg, cognitive-behavior therapy); and sequencing of pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy (ie, whether they should be started at the same time or one before the other).

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Dr. Riba is clinical professor and associate chair, Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. Dr. Tasman is professor and chairman, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY.

Address reprint requests to: Allan Tasman, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292-0001; or e-mail allan.tasman@louisville.edu.

It is now common practice for psychiatrists to provide combined psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy. The other articles in this issue discuss the relative merits of either one clinician providing both the pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy (integrated treatment), or two or more clinicians providing the medication and therapy (split treatment). Other related topics include treating patients with certain types of diagnostic problems (eg, personality disorders); particular types of psychotherapies that have been used as combined treatments (eg, cognitive-behavior therapy); and sequencing of pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy (ie, whether they should be started at the same time or one before the other).

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Dr. Riba is clinical professor and associate chair, Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. Dr. Tasman is professor and chairman, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY.

Address reprint requests to: Allan Tasman, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292-0001; or e-mail allan.tasman@louisville.edu.

10.3928/00485713-20060501-02

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