Psychiatric Annals

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Psychotherapy and Pharmacotherapy in the Treatment of Somatoform Disorders

Don R. Lipsitt, MD; Vladan Starcevic, MD, PhD, FRANZCP

Abstract

As a group, somatoform disorders present as physical disorders but lack the etiology, form, and structure of actual physical disease. They generally are believed to be associated with psychological mechanisms. Even when organic pathology is present, the somatoform symptoms either are unrelated to the pathology or are excessive.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Dr. Lipsitt is clinical professor, Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. Dr. Starcevic is associate professor, University of Sydney, and Department of Psychological Medicine, Nepean Hospital, Penrith, New South Wales, Australia.

Address reprint requests to: Don R. Lipsitt, MD, 15 Griggs Road, Brookline, MA 02446; or e-mail don_lipsitt@hms.harvard.edu.

The authors disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Abstract

As a group, somatoform disorders present as physical disorders but lack the etiology, form, and structure of actual physical disease. They generally are believed to be associated with psychological mechanisms. Even when organic pathology is present, the somatoform symptoms either are unrelated to the pathology or are excessive.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Dr. Lipsitt is clinical professor, Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. Dr. Starcevic is associate professor, University of Sydney, and Department of Psychological Medicine, Nepean Hospital, Penrith, New South Wales, Australia.

Address reprint requests to: Don R. Lipsitt, MD, 15 Griggs Road, Brookline, MA 02446; or e-mail don_lipsitt@hms.harvard.edu.

The authors disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

As a group, somatoform disorders present as physical disorders but lack the etiology, form, and structure of actual physical disease. They generally are believed to be associated with psychological mechanisms. Even when organic pathology is present, the somatoform symptoms either are unrelated to the pathology or are excessive.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Dr. Lipsitt is clinical professor, Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. Dr. Starcevic is associate professor, University of Sydney, and Department of Psychological Medicine, Nepean Hospital, Penrith, New South Wales, Australia.

Address reprint requests to: Don R. Lipsitt, MD, 15 Griggs Road, Brookline, MA 02446; or e-mail don_lipsitt@hms.harvard.edu.

The authors disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

10.3928/00485713-20060501-05

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