Psychiatric Annals

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Intracranial Infective Pathology in Neuropsychiatric Disorders

Jose A. Yaryura-Tobias, MD; Fugen Neziroglu, PhD, ABBP, ABPP

Abstract

Intracranial pathology is in need of differential diagnosis between neurological and psychiatric patients. Generally speaking, this domain is managed by neurologists. Bacterial, viral, parasitic, and other infectious agents that may invade the central nervous system (CNS) can produce encephalitis, meningitis, or brain abscess. These may relate in different degrees of severity to the anatomical structure of the brain, the meninges, and the spinal cord. Overall, these anatomophysiological constructs may modify the expression of psychiatric symptoms, to compete with neurological parameters.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Dr. Yaryura-Tobias is medical director, Bio-Behavioral Institute, Great Neck, NY, and professor, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY. Dr. Neziroglu is clinical director, Bio-Behavioral Institute, and professor, New York University School of Medicine.

Address reprint requests to: Jose A. Yaryura-Tobias, MD, 935 Northern Blvd., Suite 102, Great Neck, NY 11021; or e-mail yaryura1@aol.com.

The authors disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Abstract

Intracranial pathology is in need of differential diagnosis between neurological and psychiatric patients. Generally speaking, this domain is managed by neurologists. Bacterial, viral, parasitic, and other infectious agents that may invade the central nervous system (CNS) can produce encephalitis, meningitis, or brain abscess. These may relate in different degrees of severity to the anatomical structure of the brain, the meninges, and the spinal cord. Overall, these anatomophysiological constructs may modify the expression of psychiatric symptoms, to compete with neurological parameters.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Dr. Yaryura-Tobias is medical director, Bio-Behavioral Institute, Great Neck, NY, and professor, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY. Dr. Neziroglu is clinical director, Bio-Behavioral Institute, and professor, New York University School of Medicine.

Address reprint requests to: Jose A. Yaryura-Tobias, MD, 935 Northern Blvd., Suite 102, Great Neck, NY 11021; or e-mail yaryura1@aol.com.

The authors disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Intracranial pathology is in need of differential diagnosis between neurological and psychiatric patients. Generally speaking, this domain is managed by neurologists. Bacterial, viral, parasitic, and other infectious agents that may invade the central nervous system (CNS) can produce encephalitis, meningitis, or brain abscess. These may relate in different degrees of severity to the anatomical structure of the brain, the meninges, and the spinal cord. Overall, these anatomophysiological constructs may modify the expression of psychiatric symptoms, to compete with neurological parameters.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Dr. Yaryura-Tobias is medical director, Bio-Behavioral Institute, Great Neck, NY, and professor, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY. Dr. Neziroglu is clinical director, Bio-Behavioral Institute, and professor, New York University School of Medicine.

Address reprint requests to: Jose A. Yaryura-Tobias, MD, 935 Northern Blvd., Suite 102, Great Neck, NY 11021; or e-mail yaryura1@aol.com.

The authors disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

10.3928/00485713-20060201-04

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