Psychiatric Annals

Feature 

Obsessive-compulsive Spectrum Disorders and Rheumatic Fever

Ana G. Hounie, MD, PhD; Marcos T. Mercadante, MD, PhD; Pedro G. Alvarenga, MD; Aline S. Sampaio, MD; Anita Taub, MSc; Euripedes C. Miguel, MD, PhD

Abstract

Advances in neuroscience have generated new approaches to the classification of psychiatric disorders and the discovery of new environmental factors important in their etiology. In the context of psychiatric nosology, several lines of research support the utility of exploring some group of disorders under the concept of spectrum disorders. Among the intriguing new descriptions of environmental factors associated with psychiatric disorders, the possible interaction between specific strains of streptococci and their role in the emergence of some psychiatric disorders gained much attention in the literature. Therefore, in this article, we will present recent data supporting the concept of obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders (OCSD) and its relationship with rheumatic fever (RF), a late consequence of a streptococcus infection.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Dr. Hounie is with the Department of Psychiatry, University of São Paulo Medical School, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. Dr. Mercadante is with the Department of Psychiatry, University of São Paulo Medical School, and the Pervasive Development Disorder Program, Mackenzie Presbyterian University, São Paulo. Dr. Alvarenga, Dr. Sampaio, Ms. Taub, and Dr. Miguel are with the Department of Psychiatry, University of São Paulo Medical School.

Address reprint requests to: Ana Hounie, MD, PhD, Instituto de Psiquiatria da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (PROTOC) Rua Dr. Ovídio Pires de Campos, 785, Cerqueira César, CEP:05403010, São Paulo SP Brasil; or e-mail anah@protoc.com.br.

The authors disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

This article was supported in part by Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP) grants 99/15013-9 to Dr. Hounie and 99/12205-7 to Dr Miguel; Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico grants 521369/96 and 420122/2005-2 to Dr Miguel; the MackPesquisa to Dr. Mercadante; and the CAPES PRODOC to Dr. Hounie.

Abstract

Advances in neuroscience have generated new approaches to the classification of psychiatric disorders and the discovery of new environmental factors important in their etiology. In the context of psychiatric nosology, several lines of research support the utility of exploring some group of disorders under the concept of spectrum disorders. Among the intriguing new descriptions of environmental factors associated with psychiatric disorders, the possible interaction between specific strains of streptococci and their role in the emergence of some psychiatric disorders gained much attention in the literature. Therefore, in this article, we will present recent data supporting the concept of obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders (OCSD) and its relationship with rheumatic fever (RF), a late consequence of a streptococcus infection.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Dr. Hounie is with the Department of Psychiatry, University of São Paulo Medical School, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. Dr. Mercadante is with the Department of Psychiatry, University of São Paulo Medical School, and the Pervasive Development Disorder Program, Mackenzie Presbyterian University, São Paulo. Dr. Alvarenga, Dr. Sampaio, Ms. Taub, and Dr. Miguel are with the Department of Psychiatry, University of São Paulo Medical School.

Address reprint requests to: Ana Hounie, MD, PhD, Instituto de Psiquiatria da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (PROTOC) Rua Dr. Ovídio Pires de Campos, 785, Cerqueira César, CEP:05403010, São Paulo SP Brasil; or e-mail anah@protoc.com.br.

The authors disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

This article was supported in part by Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP) grants 99/15013-9 to Dr. Hounie and 99/12205-7 to Dr Miguel; Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico grants 521369/96 and 420122/2005-2 to Dr Miguel; the MackPesquisa to Dr. Mercadante; and the CAPES PRODOC to Dr. Hounie.

Advances in neuroscience have generated new approaches to the classification of psychiatric disorders and the discovery of new environmental factors important in their etiology. In the context of psychiatric nosology, several lines of research support the utility of exploring some group of disorders under the concept of spectrum disorders. Among the intriguing new descriptions of environmental factors associated with psychiatric disorders, the possible interaction between specific strains of streptococci and their role in the emergence of some psychiatric disorders gained much attention in the literature. Therefore, in this article, we will present recent data supporting the concept of obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders (OCSD) and its relationship with rheumatic fever (RF), a late consequence of a streptococcus infection.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Dr. Hounie is with the Department of Psychiatry, University of São Paulo Medical School, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. Dr. Mercadante is with the Department of Psychiatry, University of São Paulo Medical School, and the Pervasive Development Disorder Program, Mackenzie Presbyterian University, São Paulo. Dr. Alvarenga, Dr. Sampaio, Ms. Taub, and Dr. Miguel are with the Department of Psychiatry, University of São Paulo Medical School.

Address reprint requests to: Ana Hounie, MD, PhD, Instituto de Psiquiatria da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (PROTOC) Rua Dr. Ovídio Pires de Campos, 785, Cerqueira César, CEP:05403010, São Paulo SP Brasil; or e-mail anah@protoc.com.br.

The authors disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

This article was supported in part by Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP) grants 99/15013-9 to Dr. Hounie and 99/12205-7 to Dr Miguel; Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico grants 521369/96 and 420122/2005-2 to Dr Miguel; the MackPesquisa to Dr. Mercadante; and the CAPES PRODOC to Dr. Hounie.

10.3928/00485713-20060201-01

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