Psychiatric Annals

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Infectious Diseases in the Manifestation of Pathological Symptom Expression

Matthew D. Jacofsky, PsyD; Merry McVey-Noble, PhD; Jose A. Yaryura-Tobias, MD

Abstract

Within the scope of psychiatric and psychological practice, there exist differences of opinion as to the optimal treatment approach for addressing psychopathology. On one hand, there are those who maintain that diagnosis is secondary to the treatment of symptoms. Conversely, there are those who stress the necessity of proper diagnosis in order to facilitate the administration of the appropriate treatment. Traditionally, those more concerned with diagnosis base their position on the premise that a single symptom may serve different functions across one or more different diagnostic categories. The fact that a symptom may serve different functions that vary by diagnosis has apparent implications for treatment selection.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Dr. Jacofsky is doctoral fellow, Bio-Behavioral Institute, Great Neck, NY. Dr. McVey-Noble is licensed psychologist, Bio-Behavioral Institute and adjunct professor, Hofstra University. Dr. Yaryura-Tobias is medical director, Bio-Behavioral Institute, Great Neck, NY, and professor, New York University.

Address reprint requests to: Matthew Jacofsky, 935 Northern Blvd. Suite 102, Great Neck, NY 11021; or e-mail jacofsky123@aol.com.

The authors disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Abstract

Within the scope of psychiatric and psychological practice, there exist differences of opinion as to the optimal treatment approach for addressing psychopathology. On one hand, there are those who maintain that diagnosis is secondary to the treatment of symptoms. Conversely, there are those who stress the necessity of proper diagnosis in order to facilitate the administration of the appropriate treatment. Traditionally, those more concerned with diagnosis base their position on the premise that a single symptom may serve different functions across one or more different diagnostic categories. The fact that a symptom may serve different functions that vary by diagnosis has apparent implications for treatment selection.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Dr. Jacofsky is doctoral fellow, Bio-Behavioral Institute, Great Neck, NY. Dr. McVey-Noble is licensed psychologist, Bio-Behavioral Institute and adjunct professor, Hofstra University. Dr. Yaryura-Tobias is medical director, Bio-Behavioral Institute, Great Neck, NY, and professor, New York University.

Address reprint requests to: Matthew Jacofsky, 935 Northern Blvd. Suite 102, Great Neck, NY 11021; or e-mail jacofsky123@aol.com.

The authors disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Within the scope of psychiatric and psychological practice, there exist differences of opinion as to the optimal treatment approach for addressing psychopathology. On one hand, there are those who maintain that diagnosis is secondary to the treatment of symptoms. Conversely, there are those who stress the necessity of proper diagnosis in order to facilitate the administration of the appropriate treatment. Traditionally, those more concerned with diagnosis base their position on the premise that a single symptom may serve different functions across one or more different diagnostic categories. The fact that a symptom may serve different functions that vary by diagnosis has apparent implications for treatment selection.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Dr. Jacofsky is doctoral fellow, Bio-Behavioral Institute, Great Neck, NY. Dr. McVey-Noble is licensed psychologist, Bio-Behavioral Institute and adjunct professor, Hofstra University. Dr. Yaryura-Tobias is medical director, Bio-Behavioral Institute, Great Neck, NY, and professor, New York University.

Address reprint requests to: Matthew Jacofsky, 935 Northern Blvd. Suite 102, Great Neck, NY 11021; or e-mail jacofsky123@aol.com.

The authors disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

10.3928/00485713-20060201-05

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