Pediatric Annals

Guest Editorial 

Update on Food Allergy

Jacqueline A. Pongracic, MD

Abstract

This issue of Pediatric Annals focuses on the topic of food allergy in children. We have chosen this topic because food allergy is receiving more attention, both in the medical literature and in the mainstream press. In fact, earlier this year, the American Academy of Pediatrics published new guidelines concerning diet and development of atopic diseases. Web sites, newspapers, and other periodicals also have frequently featured personal stories about food allergies. Because of these phenomena, it is highly likely that parents will pose the question, “Does my child have a food allergy?” or “What can I feed my child?” to pediatric primary care providers before they seek consultation with an allergist/immunologist. Given the expanding amount of research, as well as current gaps in understanding of food allergy, this issue of Pediatric Annals targets key areas to help pediatricians with recognition and management.

ABOUT THE GUEST EDITOR

Jacqueline A. Pongracic, MD, is Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Medicine at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. Since 2004, she has also served as Division Head of Allergy and Immunology at Children’s Memorial Hospital in Chicago.

Dr. Pongracic completed her training in Allergy and Immunology at Johns Hopkins University. It was at that time, while working with Drs. Hugh Sampson and Robert Wood, that she developed an interest in food allergy. Since joining the medical staff at Children’s Memorial Hospital in 1991, Dr. Pongracic has focused on food allergy, developing clinical, educational, and collaborative research programs, as well as community-based programs for advocacy and education.

Abstract

This issue of Pediatric Annals focuses on the topic of food allergy in children. We have chosen this topic because food allergy is receiving more attention, both in the medical literature and in the mainstream press. In fact, earlier this year, the American Academy of Pediatrics published new guidelines concerning diet and development of atopic diseases. Web sites, newspapers, and other periodicals also have frequently featured personal stories about food allergies. Because of these phenomena, it is highly likely that parents will pose the question, “Does my child have a food allergy?” or “What can I feed my child?” to pediatric primary care providers before they seek consultation with an allergist/immunologist. Given the expanding amount of research, as well as current gaps in understanding of food allergy, this issue of Pediatric Annals targets key areas to help pediatricians with recognition and management.

ABOUT THE GUEST EDITOR

Jacqueline A. Pongracic, MD, is Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Medicine at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. Since 2004, she has also served as Division Head of Allergy and Immunology at Children’s Memorial Hospital in Chicago.

Dr. Pongracic completed her training in Allergy and Immunology at Johns Hopkins University. It was at that time, while working with Drs. Hugh Sampson and Robert Wood, that she developed an interest in food allergy. Since joining the medical staff at Children’s Memorial Hospital in 1991, Dr. Pongracic has focused on food allergy, developing clinical, educational, and collaborative research programs, as well as community-based programs for advocacy and education.

This issue of Pediatric Annals focuses on the topic of food allergy in children. We have chosen this topic because food allergy is receiving more attention, both in the medical literature and in the mainstream press. In fact, earlier this year, the American Academy of Pediatrics published new guidelines concerning diet and development of atopic diseases. Web sites, newspapers, and other periodicals also have frequently featured personal stories about food allergies. Because of these phenomena, it is highly likely that parents will pose the question, “Does my child have a food allergy?” or “What can I feed my child?” to pediatric primary care providers before they seek consultation with an allergist/immunologist. Given the expanding amount of research, as well as current gaps in understanding of food allergy, this issue of Pediatric Annals targets key areas to help pediatricians with recognition and management.

ABOUT THE GUEST EDITOR

Jacqueline A. Pongracic, MD, is Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Medicine at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. Since 2004, she has also served as Division Head of Allergy and Immunology at Children’s Memorial Hospital in Chicago.

Dr. Pongracic completed her training in Allergy and Immunology at Johns Hopkins University. It was at that time, while working with Drs. Hugh Sampson and Robert Wood, that she developed an interest in food allergy. Since joining the medical staff at Children’s Memorial Hospital in 1991, Dr. Pongracic has focused on food allergy, developing clinical, educational, and collaborative research programs, as well as community-based programs for advocacy and education.

10.3928/00904481-20080801-02

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