Pediatric Annals

CME Article 

Long-term Safety of Stimulant Medications Used to Treat Children with ADHD

Marc Lerner, MD; Tim Wigal, PhD

Abstract

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common mental health condition that impacts children, adolescents, and adults. The practice parameters of both the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) acknowledge the chronic nature of this disorder and recommend treatments that address the need to manage it over time. Patient and parent education, individualized treatment plans, coordination of multiple health services, and working with the school system are some of the tools recommended as part of ADHD management. For decades, stimulant therapy has been the primary option for ADHD management.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Marc Lerner, MD, is Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, University of California, Irvine, CA. Tim Wigal, PhD, is Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, UCI Child Development Center, Irvine, CA.

Address correspondence to: Marc Lerner, MD, UCI Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 101 The City Drive ZC 4482, Orange, CA 92868; malerner@uci.edu.

Dr. Lerner has disclosed the following relevant financial relationships: McNeil Pediatrics, Novartis, and Shire: Consultant; Cephalon, Eli Lilly, McNeil Pediatrics, Novartis, and Shire: Research Support; and Eli Lilly, McNeil Pediatrics, Novartis/UCB, and Shire: Member of Speakers’ Bureaus. Dr. Wigal has disclosed the following relevant financial relationships: Celltech Pharmaceuticals Inc./UCB, Cephalon Inc, Eli Lilly and Company, McNeil Pharmaceutical, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, and Shire Development: Consultant; and McNeil and Shire: Member of Speakers’ Bureaus.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Review the impact of new treatment options on the choice of long-term stimulant treatment regimens.
  2. In light of new Food and Drug Administration warnings, review the current evidence on cardiovascular effects of long-term attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) treatments.
  3. Compare the safety of ADHD stimulant treatment in preschool children to the safety profiles found in school-aged children.

Abstract

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common mental health condition that impacts children, adolescents, and adults. The practice parameters of both the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) acknowledge the chronic nature of this disorder and recommend treatments that address the need to manage it over time. Patient and parent education, individualized treatment plans, coordination of multiple health services, and working with the school system are some of the tools recommended as part of ADHD management. For decades, stimulant therapy has been the primary option for ADHD management.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Marc Lerner, MD, is Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, University of California, Irvine, CA. Tim Wigal, PhD, is Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, UCI Child Development Center, Irvine, CA.

Address correspondence to: Marc Lerner, MD, UCI Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 101 The City Drive ZC 4482, Orange, CA 92868; malerner@uci.edu.

Dr. Lerner has disclosed the following relevant financial relationships: McNeil Pediatrics, Novartis, and Shire: Consultant; Cephalon, Eli Lilly, McNeil Pediatrics, Novartis, and Shire: Research Support; and Eli Lilly, McNeil Pediatrics, Novartis/UCB, and Shire: Member of Speakers’ Bureaus. Dr. Wigal has disclosed the following relevant financial relationships: Celltech Pharmaceuticals Inc./UCB, Cephalon Inc, Eli Lilly and Company, McNeil Pharmaceutical, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, and Shire Development: Consultant; and McNeil and Shire: Member of Speakers’ Bureaus.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Review the impact of new treatment options on the choice of long-term stimulant treatment regimens.
  2. In light of new Food and Drug Administration warnings, review the current evidence on cardiovascular effects of long-term attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) treatments.
  3. Compare the safety of ADHD stimulant treatment in preschool children to the safety profiles found in school-aged children.

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common mental health condition that impacts children, adolescents, and adults. The practice parameters of both the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) acknowledge the chronic nature of this disorder and recommend treatments that address the need to manage it over time. Patient and parent education, individualized treatment plans, coordination of multiple health services, and working with the school system are some of the tools recommended as part of ADHD management. For decades, stimulant therapy has been the primary option for ADHD management.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Marc Lerner, MD, is Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, University of California, Irvine, CA. Tim Wigal, PhD, is Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, UCI Child Development Center, Irvine, CA.

Address correspondence to: Marc Lerner, MD, UCI Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 101 The City Drive ZC 4482, Orange, CA 92868; malerner@uci.edu.

Dr. Lerner has disclosed the following relevant financial relationships: McNeil Pediatrics, Novartis, and Shire: Consultant; Cephalon, Eli Lilly, McNeil Pediatrics, Novartis, and Shire: Research Support; and Eli Lilly, McNeil Pediatrics, Novartis/UCB, and Shire: Member of Speakers’ Bureaus. Dr. Wigal has disclosed the following relevant financial relationships: Celltech Pharmaceuticals Inc./UCB, Cephalon Inc, Eli Lilly and Company, McNeil Pharmaceutical, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, and Shire Development: Consultant; and McNeil and Shire: Member of Speakers’ Bureaus.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Review the impact of new treatment options on the choice of long-term stimulant treatment regimens.
  2. In light of new Food and Drug Administration warnings, review the current evidence on cardiovascular effects of long-term attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) treatments.
  3. Compare the safety of ADHD stimulant treatment in preschool children to the safety profiles found in school-aged children.

10.3928/00904481-20080101-05

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