Pediatric Annals

Feature Article 

Therapeutic Approaches to Developmental Disabilities in Young Children

Maris D. Rosenberg, MD

  • Pediatric Annals. 2007;36(8)
  • Posted August 1, 2007

Abstract

It is estimated that developmental disorders affect about one in six children under 18 years in the United States. Therefore, in one’s practice, pediatric primary care providers are likely to encounter delays related to motor disabilities, cognitive impairments, developmental language disorders, and autism spectrum disorders. Additional challenges are associated with managing problems, such as feeding, and behavioral disturbances, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Children with disabilities, as all children with special health care needs, require coordination among health, educational, and community resources.

ABOUT THE GUEST EDITOR

Maris D. Rosenberg, MD, is Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine (AECOM), Bronx, New York. She serves as Director of Medical Education at the Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center (CERC)/ Division of Developmental Medicine of the Department of Pediatrics at Montefiore Medical Center (MMC)/AECOM. She is director of the fellowship program in Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics at AECOM/MMC and co-director of training at the Rose F. Kennedy University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disability Education, Research, and Service. She participates in the Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics training of medical students, residents, fellows, and practicing physicians as well as in training experiences for students from numerous allied disciplines.

Dr. Rosenberg received a BS in Nutrition at Cornell University and attended SUNY Upstate Medical Center in Syracuse, New York. She completed pediatric internship and residency at Bronx Municipal Hospital Center/AECOM and fellowship training in Child Development at CERC/AECOM. She is board certified in General Pediatrics, Neurodevelopmental Disabilities, and Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics. Since completing training, she has spent 100% of her professional time in the developmental disability field, working closely with allied health professionals in a multidisciplinary team format. She currently serves as co-chair of the American Academy of Pediatrics Chapter 3 Committee on Children with Disabilities.

Abstract

It is estimated that developmental disorders affect about one in six children under 18 years in the United States. Therefore, in one’s practice, pediatric primary care providers are likely to encounter delays related to motor disabilities, cognitive impairments, developmental language disorders, and autism spectrum disorders. Additional challenges are associated with managing problems, such as feeding, and behavioral disturbances, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Children with disabilities, as all children with special health care needs, require coordination among health, educational, and community resources.

ABOUT THE GUEST EDITOR

Maris D. Rosenberg, MD, is Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine (AECOM), Bronx, New York. She serves as Director of Medical Education at the Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center (CERC)/ Division of Developmental Medicine of the Department of Pediatrics at Montefiore Medical Center (MMC)/AECOM. She is director of the fellowship program in Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics at AECOM/MMC and co-director of training at the Rose F. Kennedy University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disability Education, Research, and Service. She participates in the Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics training of medical students, residents, fellows, and practicing physicians as well as in training experiences for students from numerous allied disciplines.

Dr. Rosenberg received a BS in Nutrition at Cornell University and attended SUNY Upstate Medical Center in Syracuse, New York. She completed pediatric internship and residency at Bronx Municipal Hospital Center/AECOM and fellowship training in Child Development at CERC/AECOM. She is board certified in General Pediatrics, Neurodevelopmental Disabilities, and Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics. Since completing training, she has spent 100% of her professional time in the developmental disability field, working closely with allied health professionals in a multidisciplinary team format. She currently serves as co-chair of the American Academy of Pediatrics Chapter 3 Committee on Children with Disabilities.

It is estimated that developmental disorders affect about one in six children under 18 years in the United States. Therefore, in one’s practice, pediatric primary care providers are likely to encounter delays related to motor disabilities, cognitive impairments, developmental language disorders, and autism spectrum disorders. Additional challenges are associated with managing problems, such as feeding, and behavioral disturbances, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Children with disabilities, as all children with special health care needs, require coordination among health, educational, and community resources.

ABOUT THE GUEST EDITOR

Maris D. Rosenberg, MD, is Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine (AECOM), Bronx, New York. She serves as Director of Medical Education at the Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center (CERC)/ Division of Developmental Medicine of the Department of Pediatrics at Montefiore Medical Center (MMC)/AECOM. She is director of the fellowship program in Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics at AECOM/MMC and co-director of training at the Rose F. Kennedy University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disability Education, Research, and Service. She participates in the Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics training of medical students, residents, fellows, and practicing physicians as well as in training experiences for students from numerous allied disciplines.

Dr. Rosenberg received a BS in Nutrition at Cornell University and attended SUNY Upstate Medical Center in Syracuse, New York. She completed pediatric internship and residency at Bronx Municipal Hospital Center/AECOM and fellowship training in Child Development at CERC/AECOM. She is board certified in General Pediatrics, Neurodevelopmental Disabilities, and Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics. Since completing training, she has spent 100% of her professional time in the developmental disability field, working closely with allied health professionals in a multidisciplinary team format. She currently serves as co-chair of the American Academy of Pediatrics Chapter 3 Committee on Children with Disabilities.

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