Pediatric Annals

CME Article 

Occupational and Physical Therapy Approaches to Sensory and Motor Issues

Lillian Kornhaber, PT, MPH; Elizabeth Ridgway, OTR; Rani Kathirithamby, MD

  • Pediatric Annals. 2007;36(8)
  • Posted August 1, 2007

Abstract

The foundations for skills that are needed throughout life are established in early development. Pediatricians, the medical professionals who have the most frequent contact with children, are in a key position to identify developmental deviations in their patients. Early detection, along with intervention, has the potential to impact the child’s life significantly and to effect changes that will cover the child’s entire life span.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Lillian Kornhaber, PT, MPH, is Supervisor of Physical Therapy, Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center, Rose F. Kennedy Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. Elizabeth Ridgway, OTR, is Supervisor of Occupational Therapy, Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center, Rose F. Kennedy Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Rani Kathirithamby, MD, is Associate Clinical Professor of Rehabilitation Medicine and Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and Director of Rehabilitation Unit, Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center, Rose F. Kennedy Center.

Address correspondence to: Lillian Kornhaber, PT, MPH, 1410 Pelham Parkway South, Bronx, New York 10461; fax 718-823-4877; e-mail: lkornhab@aecom.yu.edu.

Ms. Kornhaber, Ms. Ridgway, and Dr. Kathirithamby have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Recognize the importance of early identification of developmental difficulties and intervention in children.
  2. Identify behaviors that indicate need for referral to physical and/or occupational therapy for a child.
  3. Assess the need for ongoing collaboration between the pediatrician and therapist(s) to achieve optimal outcomes for both child and family.

Abstract

The foundations for skills that are needed throughout life are established in early development. Pediatricians, the medical professionals who have the most frequent contact with children, are in a key position to identify developmental deviations in their patients. Early detection, along with intervention, has the potential to impact the child’s life significantly and to effect changes that will cover the child’s entire life span.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Lillian Kornhaber, PT, MPH, is Supervisor of Physical Therapy, Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center, Rose F. Kennedy Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. Elizabeth Ridgway, OTR, is Supervisor of Occupational Therapy, Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center, Rose F. Kennedy Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Rani Kathirithamby, MD, is Associate Clinical Professor of Rehabilitation Medicine and Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and Director of Rehabilitation Unit, Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center, Rose F. Kennedy Center.

Address correspondence to: Lillian Kornhaber, PT, MPH, 1410 Pelham Parkway South, Bronx, New York 10461; fax 718-823-4877; e-mail: lkornhab@aecom.yu.edu.

Ms. Kornhaber, Ms. Ridgway, and Dr. Kathirithamby have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Recognize the importance of early identification of developmental difficulties and intervention in children.
  2. Identify behaviors that indicate need for referral to physical and/or occupational therapy for a child.
  3. Assess the need for ongoing collaboration between the pediatrician and therapist(s) to achieve optimal outcomes for both child and family.

The foundations for skills that are needed throughout life are established in early development. Pediatricians, the medical professionals who have the most frequent contact with children, are in a key position to identify developmental deviations in their patients. Early detection, along with intervention, has the potential to impact the child’s life significantly and to effect changes that will cover the child’s entire life span.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Lillian Kornhaber, PT, MPH, is Supervisor of Physical Therapy, Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center, Rose F. Kennedy Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. Elizabeth Ridgway, OTR, is Supervisor of Occupational Therapy, Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center, Rose F. Kennedy Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Rani Kathirithamby, MD, is Associate Clinical Professor of Rehabilitation Medicine and Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and Director of Rehabilitation Unit, Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center, Rose F. Kennedy Center.

Address correspondence to: Lillian Kornhaber, PT, MPH, 1410 Pelham Parkway South, Bronx, New York 10461; fax 718-823-4877; e-mail: lkornhab@aecom.yu.edu.

Ms. Kornhaber, Ms. Ridgway, and Dr. Kathirithamby have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Recognize the importance of early identification of developmental difficulties and intervention in children.
  2. Identify behaviors that indicate need for referral to physical and/or occupational therapy for a child.
  3. Assess the need for ongoing collaboration between the pediatrician and therapist(s) to achieve optimal outcomes for both child and family.

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