Pediatric Annals

CME Article 

Therapeutic Approaches to Speech and Language Disorders in Early Childhood

Nancy Tarshis, MA, MS, CCC-SLP; Brenda G. Rodriguez, MS, CCC-SLP; Rosa M. Seijo, MD

  • Pediatric Annals. 2007;36(8)
  • Posted August 1, 2007

Abstract

Human communication is primarily experienced through the use of language, a fundamental capacity that drives interpersonal interaction and the ability to learn. In its many forms (written, verbal, gestural signs, or tactile) language skills are used to share ideas, feelings, wants, needs, and emotions. Delays in the development of language and speech during the first 3 years of life can lead to difficulties in the ability to communicate and socialize with important childhood figures. They prevent the child from fully interacting with and learning from his/her environment. Parents eagerly anticipate achievement of language milestones. A child who does not speak or does not speak clearly raises concern about his/her ability to function effectively.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Nancy Tarshis, MA, MS, CCC-SLP, is Supervisor of Speech and Language Services, Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center, Rose F. Kennedy Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. Brenda G. Rodriguez, MS, CCC-SLP, is Bilingual Speech-Language Pathologist, Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center, Rose F. Kennedy Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Rosa M. Seijo, MD, is Assistant Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Early Intervention Medical Director, Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center, Rose F. Kennedy Center.

Address correspondence to: Nancy Tarshis, MA, CCC-SLP, 1165 Morris Park Avenue, Second Floor, Bronx, NY 10461; fax 718-430-3989; e-mail ntarshis@aecom.yu.edu.

Ms. Tarshis, Ms. Rodriguez, and Dr. Seijo have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Recognize the importance of speech and language therapy in common developmental disabilities.
  2. Review available therapies for common speech and language disorders and the criteria for appropriate referral.
  3. Describe the speech pathologist’s role in the treatment of speech and language disorders as well as other common developmental disabilities.

Abstract

Human communication is primarily experienced through the use of language, a fundamental capacity that drives interpersonal interaction and the ability to learn. In its many forms (written, verbal, gestural signs, or tactile) language skills are used to share ideas, feelings, wants, needs, and emotions. Delays in the development of language and speech during the first 3 years of life can lead to difficulties in the ability to communicate and socialize with important childhood figures. They prevent the child from fully interacting with and learning from his/her environment. Parents eagerly anticipate achievement of language milestones. A child who does not speak or does not speak clearly raises concern about his/her ability to function effectively.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Nancy Tarshis, MA, MS, CCC-SLP, is Supervisor of Speech and Language Services, Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center, Rose F. Kennedy Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. Brenda G. Rodriguez, MS, CCC-SLP, is Bilingual Speech-Language Pathologist, Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center, Rose F. Kennedy Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Rosa M. Seijo, MD, is Assistant Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Early Intervention Medical Director, Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center, Rose F. Kennedy Center.

Address correspondence to: Nancy Tarshis, MA, CCC-SLP, 1165 Morris Park Avenue, Second Floor, Bronx, NY 10461; fax 718-430-3989; e-mail ntarshis@aecom.yu.edu.

Ms. Tarshis, Ms. Rodriguez, and Dr. Seijo have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Recognize the importance of speech and language therapy in common developmental disabilities.
  2. Review available therapies for common speech and language disorders and the criteria for appropriate referral.
  3. Describe the speech pathologist’s role in the treatment of speech and language disorders as well as other common developmental disabilities.

Human communication is primarily experienced through the use of language, a fundamental capacity that drives interpersonal interaction and the ability to learn. In its many forms (written, verbal, gestural signs, or tactile) language skills are used to share ideas, feelings, wants, needs, and emotions. Delays in the development of language and speech during the first 3 years of life can lead to difficulties in the ability to communicate and socialize with important childhood figures. They prevent the child from fully interacting with and learning from his/her environment. Parents eagerly anticipate achievement of language milestones. A child who does not speak or does not speak clearly raises concern about his/her ability to function effectively.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Nancy Tarshis, MA, MS, CCC-SLP, is Supervisor of Speech and Language Services, Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center, Rose F. Kennedy Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. Brenda G. Rodriguez, MS, CCC-SLP, is Bilingual Speech-Language Pathologist, Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center, Rose F. Kennedy Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Rosa M. Seijo, MD, is Assistant Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Early Intervention Medical Director, Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center, Rose F. Kennedy Center.

Address correspondence to: Nancy Tarshis, MA, CCC-SLP, 1165 Morris Park Avenue, Second Floor, Bronx, NY 10461; fax 718-430-3989; e-mail ntarshis@aecom.yu.edu.

Ms. Tarshis, Ms. Rodriguez, and Dr. Seijo have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Recognize the importance of speech and language therapy in common developmental disabilities.
  2. Review available therapies for common speech and language disorders and the criteria for appropriate referral.
  3. Describe the speech pathologist’s role in the treatment of speech and language disorders as well as other common developmental disabilities.

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