Pediatric Annals

CME Article 

New Immunization Strategies for Preventing Infectious Diseases in Adolescents

Erin M. Bennett, MSc; Joseph B. Domachowske, MD

  • Pediatric Annals. 2007;36(6)
  • Posted June 1, 2007

Abstract

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released the 2007 recommended immunization schedule in January 2007. For the first time, vaccines recommended for infants and young children and vaccines recommended for older children and adolescents have been divided into separate tables. The table for older children outlines the recommendations for ages 7 to 18 years, including routine immunization with human papillomavirus vaccine, conjugate meningococcal vaccine, and diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (DTaP) vaccine, with catch-up immunizations for hepatitis B, polio, measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella vaccines. In addition, reminders that certain high-risk groups should be immunized with pneumococcal vaccine, hepatitis A vaccine, and annual influenza vaccine are included.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Erin M. Bennett, MSc; and Joseph B. Domachowske, MD, are from the State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Department of Pediatrics.

Address correspondence to Joseph B. Domachowske, MD, State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Department of Pediatrics, 750 East Adams Street, Syracuse, NY 13210; fax 315-464-7564; or e-mail domachoj@upstate.edu.

Ms. Bennett has disclosed no relevant financial relationships. Dr. Domachowske has disclosed the following relevant financial relationships: MedImmune, Merck, and Sanofi: Member of speakers’ bureau and clinical investigator.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Describe the rationale for universal adolescent vaccination against invasive meningococcal infection based on epidemiology of the infection.
  2. Summarize the potential individual and public health benefits from universal immunization with human papillomavirus vaccine.
  3. Recognize that boosting immunization with pertussis-containing vaccines during adolescence and adulthood is an important strategy to improve overall herd immunity for all age groups.

Abstract

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released the 2007 recommended immunization schedule in January 2007. For the first time, vaccines recommended for infants and young children and vaccines recommended for older children and adolescents have been divided into separate tables. The table for older children outlines the recommendations for ages 7 to 18 years, including routine immunization with human papillomavirus vaccine, conjugate meningococcal vaccine, and diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (DTaP) vaccine, with catch-up immunizations for hepatitis B, polio, measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella vaccines. In addition, reminders that certain high-risk groups should be immunized with pneumococcal vaccine, hepatitis A vaccine, and annual influenza vaccine are included.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Erin M. Bennett, MSc; and Joseph B. Domachowske, MD, are from the State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Department of Pediatrics.

Address correspondence to Joseph B. Domachowske, MD, State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Department of Pediatrics, 750 East Adams Street, Syracuse, NY 13210; fax 315-464-7564; or e-mail domachoj@upstate.edu.

Ms. Bennett has disclosed no relevant financial relationships. Dr. Domachowske has disclosed the following relevant financial relationships: MedImmune, Merck, and Sanofi: Member of speakers’ bureau and clinical investigator.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Describe the rationale for universal adolescent vaccination against invasive meningococcal infection based on epidemiology of the infection.
  2. Summarize the potential individual and public health benefits from universal immunization with human papillomavirus vaccine.
  3. Recognize that boosting immunization with pertussis-containing vaccines during adolescence and adulthood is an important strategy to improve overall herd immunity for all age groups.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released the 2007 recommended immunization schedule in January 2007. For the first time, vaccines recommended for infants and young children and vaccines recommended for older children and adolescents have been divided into separate tables. The table for older children outlines the recommendations for ages 7 to 18 years, including routine immunization with human papillomavirus vaccine, conjugate meningococcal vaccine, and diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (DTaP) vaccine, with catch-up immunizations for hepatitis B, polio, measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella vaccines. In addition, reminders that certain high-risk groups should be immunized with pneumococcal vaccine, hepatitis A vaccine, and annual influenza vaccine are included.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Erin M. Bennett, MSc; and Joseph B. Domachowske, MD, are from the State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Department of Pediatrics.

Address correspondence to Joseph B. Domachowske, MD, State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Department of Pediatrics, 750 East Adams Street, Syracuse, NY 13210; fax 315-464-7564; or e-mail domachoj@upstate.edu.

Ms. Bennett has disclosed no relevant financial relationships. Dr. Domachowske has disclosed the following relevant financial relationships: MedImmune, Merck, and Sanofi: Member of speakers’ bureau and clinical investigator.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Describe the rationale for universal adolescent vaccination against invasive meningococcal infection based on epidemiology of the infection.
  2. Summarize the potential individual and public health benefits from universal immunization with human papillomavirus vaccine.
  3. Recognize that boosting immunization with pertussis-containing vaccines during adolescence and adulthood is an important strategy to improve overall herd immunity for all age groups.

Sign up to receive

Journal E-contents