Pediatric Annals

CME Article 

Germs on a Plane — Infectious Issues and the Pediatric International Traveler: What Pediatricians Should Know

Paul J. Lee, MD; Leonard R. Krilov, MD

  • Pediatric Annals. 2007;36(6)
  • Posted June 1, 2007

Abstract

The 2006 summer film Snakes on a Plane pandered to every flyer’s fear of being exposed to a deadly threat while en route to a vacation destination. Unfortunately, real world global travel is potentially far more risky to a child’s health than anything Hollywood could ever imagine.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Paul J. Lee, MD, and Leonard R. Krilov, MD, are with Winthrop-University Hospital, Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Mineola, N.Y.

Address correspondence to: Paul J. Lee, MD, Winthrop-University Hospital, Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, 120 Mineola Blvd, Suite 210, Mineola, NY 11501; fax 516-663-3793; or e-mail plee@winthrop.org.

Dr. Lee disclosed no relevant financial relationships. Dr. Krilov has disclosed the following relevant financial relationships: Abbott Laboratories, MedImmune, Merck, GlaxoSmithKline, Sanofi: Member of speakers’ bureau; and MedImmune and Sanofi: Research grant recipient.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Review the epidemiology, clinical presentation, and diagnosis of common global infectious diseases not commonly seen in the United States, such as traveler’s diarrhea and malaria.
  2. Identify appropriate recommendations and preventive strategies to protect the pediatric international traveler against infectious diseases likely to be encountered.
  3. Recognize and be able to discuss the important immunizations against preventable infections in the pediatric international traveler, with emphasis on practical usage, and benefi ts versus side effects.

Abstract

The 2006 summer film Snakes on a Plane pandered to every flyer’s fear of being exposed to a deadly threat while en route to a vacation destination. Unfortunately, real world global travel is potentially far more risky to a child’s health than anything Hollywood could ever imagine.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Paul J. Lee, MD, and Leonard R. Krilov, MD, are with Winthrop-University Hospital, Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Mineola, N.Y.

Address correspondence to: Paul J. Lee, MD, Winthrop-University Hospital, Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, 120 Mineola Blvd, Suite 210, Mineola, NY 11501; fax 516-663-3793; or e-mail plee@winthrop.org.

Dr. Lee disclosed no relevant financial relationships. Dr. Krilov has disclosed the following relevant financial relationships: Abbott Laboratories, MedImmune, Merck, GlaxoSmithKline, Sanofi: Member of speakers’ bureau; and MedImmune and Sanofi: Research grant recipient.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Review the epidemiology, clinical presentation, and diagnosis of common global infectious diseases not commonly seen in the United States, such as traveler’s diarrhea and malaria.
  2. Identify appropriate recommendations and preventive strategies to protect the pediatric international traveler against infectious diseases likely to be encountered.
  3. Recognize and be able to discuss the important immunizations against preventable infections in the pediatric international traveler, with emphasis on practical usage, and benefi ts versus side effects.

The 2006 summer film Snakes on a Plane pandered to every flyer’s fear of being exposed to a deadly threat while en route to a vacation destination. Unfortunately, real world global travel is potentially far more risky to a child’s health than anything Hollywood could ever imagine.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Paul J. Lee, MD, and Leonard R. Krilov, MD, are with Winthrop-University Hospital, Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Mineola, N.Y.

Address correspondence to: Paul J. Lee, MD, Winthrop-University Hospital, Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, 120 Mineola Blvd, Suite 210, Mineola, NY 11501; fax 516-663-3793; or e-mail plee@winthrop.org.

Dr. Lee disclosed no relevant financial relationships. Dr. Krilov has disclosed the following relevant financial relationships: Abbott Laboratories, MedImmune, Merck, GlaxoSmithKline, Sanofi: Member of speakers’ bureau; and MedImmune and Sanofi: Research grant recipient.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Review the epidemiology, clinical presentation, and diagnosis of common global infectious diseases not commonly seen in the United States, such as traveler’s diarrhea and malaria.
  2. Identify appropriate recommendations and preventive strategies to protect the pediatric international traveler against infectious diseases likely to be encountered.
  3. Recognize and be able to discuss the important immunizations against preventable infections in the pediatric international traveler, with emphasis on practical usage, and benefi ts versus side effects.

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