Pediatric Annals

CME Article 

Type 2 Diabetes in Children and Adolescents

Chayim Y. Newmark, MD, FAAP; Henry Anhalt, DO, FAAP, FACOP, FACE, CDE

  • Pediatric Annals. 2007;36(2)
  • Posted February 1, 2007

Abstract

In 1979 Savage and colleagues’ description of type 2 diabetes in six obese Pima Indian children with strong family histories of type 2 diabetes was the first report of type 2 diabetes in children. Prior to the 1990s, it was rare to diagnose children or adolescents with type 2 diabetes. Any time a patient with presumed type 2 diabetes in childhood presented, all of the medical students and house staff would gather at the bedside to see this unusual case. By 1994, type 2 diabetes represented up to 16% of new cases of diabetes in children in urban areas. By 1999, that number had increased to 45% of all cases of diabetes in children in some geographic areas. In 2001, type 2 diabetes represented 76% of all cases of diabetes among American Indian populations.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Chayim Y. Newmark, MD, FAAP is Attending Physician, Saint Barnabas Medical Center/Ambulatory Care Center, Livingston, New Jersey. Henry Anhalt, DO, FAAP, FACOP, FACE, CDE, is Division Director, Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Saint Barnabas Medical Center/Ambulatory Care Center, Livingston, New Jersey, and Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics, SUNY Downstate Medical School, Brooklyn, New York.

Address correspondence to: Chayim Y. Newmark, MD, Saint Barnabas Medical Center/Ambulatory Care Center, 200 South Orange Avenue, Livingston, NJ 07039; fax (973) 322-7504; or email cnewmark@sbhcs.com.

The authors disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Discuss the epidemiology of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents.
  2. Review the current recommendations for screening for and diagnosis of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents.
  3. Identify pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatment strategies for type 2 diabetes in the pediatric population.

Abstract

In 1979 Savage and colleagues’ description of type 2 diabetes in six obese Pima Indian children with strong family histories of type 2 diabetes was the first report of type 2 diabetes in children. Prior to the 1990s, it was rare to diagnose children or adolescents with type 2 diabetes. Any time a patient with presumed type 2 diabetes in childhood presented, all of the medical students and house staff would gather at the bedside to see this unusual case. By 1994, type 2 diabetes represented up to 16% of new cases of diabetes in children in urban areas. By 1999, that number had increased to 45% of all cases of diabetes in children in some geographic areas. In 2001, type 2 diabetes represented 76% of all cases of diabetes among American Indian populations.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Chayim Y. Newmark, MD, FAAP is Attending Physician, Saint Barnabas Medical Center/Ambulatory Care Center, Livingston, New Jersey. Henry Anhalt, DO, FAAP, FACOP, FACE, CDE, is Division Director, Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Saint Barnabas Medical Center/Ambulatory Care Center, Livingston, New Jersey, and Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics, SUNY Downstate Medical School, Brooklyn, New York.

Address correspondence to: Chayim Y. Newmark, MD, Saint Barnabas Medical Center/Ambulatory Care Center, 200 South Orange Avenue, Livingston, NJ 07039; fax (973) 322-7504; or email cnewmark@sbhcs.com.

The authors disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Discuss the epidemiology of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents.
  2. Review the current recommendations for screening for and diagnosis of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents.
  3. Identify pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatment strategies for type 2 diabetes in the pediatric population.

In 1979 Savage and colleagues’ description of type 2 diabetes in six obese Pima Indian children with strong family histories of type 2 diabetes was the first report of type 2 diabetes in children. Prior to the 1990s, it was rare to diagnose children or adolescents with type 2 diabetes. Any time a patient with presumed type 2 diabetes in childhood presented, all of the medical students and house staff would gather at the bedside to see this unusual case. By 1994, type 2 diabetes represented up to 16% of new cases of diabetes in children in urban areas. By 1999, that number had increased to 45% of all cases of diabetes in children in some geographic areas. In 2001, type 2 diabetes represented 76% of all cases of diabetes among American Indian populations.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Chayim Y. Newmark, MD, FAAP is Attending Physician, Saint Barnabas Medical Center/Ambulatory Care Center, Livingston, New Jersey. Henry Anhalt, DO, FAAP, FACOP, FACE, CDE, is Division Director, Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Saint Barnabas Medical Center/Ambulatory Care Center, Livingston, New Jersey, and Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics, SUNY Downstate Medical School, Brooklyn, New York.

Address correspondence to: Chayim Y. Newmark, MD, Saint Barnabas Medical Center/Ambulatory Care Center, 200 South Orange Avenue, Livingston, NJ 07039; fax (973) 322-7504; or email cnewmark@sbhcs.com.

The authors disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Discuss the epidemiology of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents.
  2. Review the current recommendations for screening for and diagnosis of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents.
  3. Identify pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatment strategies for type 2 diabetes in the pediatric population.

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