Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services

The articles prior to January 2012 are part of the back file collection and are not available with a current paid subscription. To access the article, you may purchase it or purchase the complete back file collection here

Psychopharmacology 

Pharmacotherapy for Psychotropic Drug-Related Weight Gain

Robert H. Howland, MD

  • Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services. 2008;46(7)
  • Posted July 1, 2008

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Weight gain is a significant problem for many patients taking various psychotropic medications. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved certain medications for the treatment of obesity. Other medications known to be associated with weight loss could be used for treating obesity, although they are not FDA approved for this indication. This article briefly describes the sympathomimetic, antidepressant, anticonvulsant, histamine-modulating, antidiabetic, and gastrointestinal drugs that have been found to cause weight loss and might be considered for adjunctive use in the overall management of psychotropic drug-related weight gain. However, even if such drugs are effective, all patients should receive ongoing dietary and physical activity counseling.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Howland is Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The author discloses that he has no significant financial interests in any product or class of products discussed directly or indirectly in this activity, including research support.

Address correspondence to Robert H. Howland, MD, Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, 3811 O’Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213; e-mail: HowlandRH@upmc.edu.

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Weight gain is a significant problem for many patients taking various psychotropic medications. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved certain medications for the treatment of obesity. Other medications known to be associated with weight loss could be used for treating obesity, although they are not FDA approved for this indication. This article briefly describes the sympathomimetic, antidepressant, anticonvulsant, histamine-modulating, antidiabetic, and gastrointestinal drugs that have been found to cause weight loss and might be considered for adjunctive use in the overall management of psychotropic drug-related weight gain. However, even if such drugs are effective, all patients should receive ongoing dietary and physical activity counseling.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Howland is Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The author discloses that he has no significant financial interests in any product or class of products discussed directly or indirectly in this activity, including research support.

Address correspondence to Robert H. Howland, MD, Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, 3811 O’Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213; e-mail: HowlandRH@upmc.edu.

Sign up to receive

Journal E-contents