Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services

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CNE Article 

Becoming Culturally Competent in Ethnic Psychopharmacology

Josepha Campinha-Bacote, PhD, MAR, APRN, BC, CTN, FAAN

Abstract

People from minority backgrounds who have a mental illness experience double discrimination associated with both mental illness and race. In 2001, the Surgeon General’s landmark report on race, culture, ethnicity, and mental health compellingly documented racial and ethnic disparities in mental health care related to issues of misdiagnosis, underuse, overrepresentation, and improper treatment. The report called for sound research, including investigation into the area of psychopharmacology, to determine the extent to which the variability of an individual’s response to medications is accounted for by factors related to race, ethnicity, age, gender, family history, or lifestyle. This article will focus on the realm of ethnic psychopharmacology and propose a practice model for nurses to become culturally competent in the area of ethnic psychopharmacology.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Campinha-Bacote is President, Transcultural C.A.R.E. Associates, Cincinnati, Ohio.

The author discloses that she has no significant financial interests in any product or class of products discussed directly or indirectly in this activity, including research support.

Address correspondence to Josepha Campinha-Bacote, PhD, MAR, APRN, BC, CTN, FAAN, President, Transcultural C.A.R.E. Associates, 11108 Huntwicke Place, Cincinnati, OH 45241; e-mail: meddir@aol.com.

Abstract

People from minority backgrounds who have a mental illness experience double discrimination associated with both mental illness and race. In 2001, the Surgeon General’s landmark report on race, culture, ethnicity, and mental health compellingly documented racial and ethnic disparities in mental health care related to issues of misdiagnosis, underuse, overrepresentation, and improper treatment. The report called for sound research, including investigation into the area of psychopharmacology, to determine the extent to which the variability of an individual’s response to medications is accounted for by factors related to race, ethnicity, age, gender, family history, or lifestyle. This article will focus on the realm of ethnic psychopharmacology and propose a practice model for nurses to become culturally competent in the area of ethnic psychopharmacology.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Campinha-Bacote is President, Transcultural C.A.R.E. Associates, Cincinnati, Ohio.

The author discloses that she has no significant financial interests in any product or class of products discussed directly or indirectly in this activity, including research support.

Address correspondence to Josepha Campinha-Bacote, PhD, MAR, APRN, BC, CTN, FAAN, President, Transcultural C.A.R.E. Associates, 11108 Huntwicke Place, Cincinnati, OH 45241; e-mail: meddir@aol.com.

ABSTRACT

People from minority backgrounds who have a mental illness experience double discrimination associated with both mental illness and race. In 2001, the Surgeon General’s landmark report on race, culture, ethnicity, and mental health compellingly documented racial and ethnic disparities in mental health care related to issues of misdiagnosis, underuse, overrepresentation, and improper treatment. The report called for sound research, including investigation into the area of psychopharmacology, to determine the extent to which the variability of an individual’s response to medications is accounted for by factors related to race, ethnicity, age, gender, family history, or lifestyle. This article will focus on the realm of ethnic psychopharmacology and propose a practice model for nurses to become culturally competent in the area of ethnic psychopharmacology.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Campinha-Bacote is President, Transcultural C.A.R.E. Associates, Cincinnati, Ohio.

The author discloses that she has no significant financial interests in any product or class of products discussed directly or indirectly in this activity, including research support.

Address correspondence to Josepha Campinha-Bacote, PhD, MAR, APRN, BC, CTN, FAAN, President, Transcultural C.A.R.E. Associates, 11108 Huntwicke Place, Cincinnati, OH 45241; e-mail: meddir@aol.com.

10.3928/02793695-20070901-09

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