Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services

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Psychopharmacology 

Paliperidone Extended-Release Tablets: A New Atypical Antipsychotic

Robert H. Howland, MD

  • Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services. 2007;45(5):15-18
  • Posted May 1, 2007

Abstract

This article reviews the use of the new atypical antipsychotic drug paliperidone extended-release (Pal-ER). Pal-ER is a delayed-release formulation that provides continual drug delivery over 24 hours and reduces fluctuations in serum drug concentrations. This delayed release minimizes side effects related to high serum levels that occur with immediate-release formulations. Pal-ER is effective, safe, and relatively well tolerated. Although Pal-ER does not have any major advantages or disadvantages compared with other antipsychotic drugs, it has unique pharmacological properties and may be a beneficial alternative medication for some patients.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Howland is Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The author discloses that he has no significant financial interests in any product or class of products discussed directly or indirectly in this activity, including research support.

Address correspondence to Robert H. Howland, MD, Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, 3811 O’Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213; e-mail: HowlandRH@upmc.edu.

Abstract

This article reviews the use of the new atypical antipsychotic drug paliperidone extended-release (Pal-ER). Pal-ER is a delayed-release formulation that provides continual drug delivery over 24 hours and reduces fluctuations in serum drug concentrations. This delayed release minimizes side effects related to high serum levels that occur with immediate-release formulations. Pal-ER is effective, safe, and relatively well tolerated. Although Pal-ER does not have any major advantages or disadvantages compared with other antipsychotic drugs, it has unique pharmacological properties and may be a beneficial alternative medication for some patients.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Howland is Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The author discloses that he has no significant financial interests in any product or class of products discussed directly or indirectly in this activity, including research support.

Address correspondence to Robert H. Howland, MD, Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, 3811 O’Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213; e-mail: HowlandRH@upmc.edu.

ABSTRACT

This article reviews the use of the new atypical antipsychotic drug paliperidone extended-release (Pal-ER). Pal-ER is a delayed-release formulation that provides continual drug delivery over 24 hours and reduces fluctuations in serum drug concentrations. This delayed release minimizes side effects related to high serum levels that occur with immediate-release formulations. Pal-ER is effective, safe, and relatively well tolerated. Although Pal-ER does not have any major advantages or disadvantages compared with other antipsychotic drugs, it has unique pharmacological properties and may be a beneficial alternative medication for some patients.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Howland is Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The author discloses that he has no significant financial interests in any product or class of products discussed directly or indirectly in this activity, including research support.

Address correspondence to Robert H. Howland, MD, Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, 3811 O’Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213; e-mail: HowlandRH@upmc.edu.

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