Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services

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Psychopharmacology 

Unusual and Serious Adverse Effects of SSRIs: Recognition and Management

Robert H. Howland, MD

  • Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services. 2007;45(3):15-18
  • Posted March 1, 2007

Abstract

EXCERPT

The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant agents fluvoxamine (Luvox®), fluoxetine (Prozac®), paroxetine (Paxil®), sertraline (Zoloft®), citalopram (Celexa®), and escitalopram (Lexapro®) are commonly used, generally well tolerated, and considered safe, especially compared with the older-generation tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) (Howland & Thase, 2002). Because of their potent effects on serotonin reuptake, SSRIs are associated with various noxious (Masand & Gupta, 1999) and sometimes serious adverse effects (Ener, Meglathery, Van Decker, & Gallagher, 2003). In last month’s Psychopharmacology article, I focused on some of the most common and clinically important side effects of SSRIs. In this article, I will review more unusual and serious adverse effects associated with SSRIs.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Howland is Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The author discloses that he has no significant financial interests in any product or class of products discussed directly or indirectly in this activity, including research support.

Address correspondence to Robert H. Howland, MD, Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, 3811 O’Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213; e-mail: HowlandRH@upmc.edu.

Abstract

EXCERPT

The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant agents fluvoxamine (Luvox®), fluoxetine (Prozac®), paroxetine (Paxil®), sertraline (Zoloft®), citalopram (Celexa®), and escitalopram (Lexapro®) are commonly used, generally well tolerated, and considered safe, especially compared with the older-generation tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) (Howland & Thase, 2002). Because of their potent effects on serotonin reuptake, SSRIs are associated with various noxious (Masand & Gupta, 1999) and sometimes serious adverse effects (Ener, Meglathery, Van Decker, & Gallagher, 2003). In last month’s Psychopharmacology article, I focused on some of the most common and clinically important side effects of SSRIs. In this article, I will review more unusual and serious adverse effects associated with SSRIs.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Howland is Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The author discloses that he has no significant financial interests in any product or class of products discussed directly or indirectly in this activity, including research support.

Address correspondence to Robert H. Howland, MD, Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, 3811 O’Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213; e-mail: HowlandRH@upmc.edu.

EXCERPT

The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant agents fluvoxamine (Luvox®), fluoxetine (Prozac®), paroxetine (Paxil®), sertraline (Zoloft®), citalopram (Celexa®), and escitalopram (Lexapro®) are commonly used, generally well tolerated, and considered safe, especially compared with the older-generation tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) (Howland & Thase, 2002). Because of their potent effects on serotonin reuptake, SSRIs are associated with various noxious (Masand & Gupta, 1999) and sometimes serious adverse effects (Ener, Meglathery, Van Decker, & Gallagher, 2003). In last month’s Psychopharmacology article, I focused on some of the most common and clinically important side effects of SSRIs. In this article, I will review more unusual and serious adverse effects associated with SSRIs.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Howland is Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The author discloses that he has no significant financial interests in any product or class of products discussed directly or indirectly in this activity, including research support.

Address correspondence to Robert H. Howland, MD, Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, 3811 O’Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213; e-mail: HowlandRH@upmc.edu.

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