Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services

The articles prior to January 2012 are part of the back file collection and are not available with a current paid subscription. To access the article, you may purchase it or purchase the complete back file collection here

Psychopharmacology 

Cytochrome P450 Testing for Better Psychiatric Care

Elizabeth L. Pestka, MS, APRN, BC, APNG; Ann M. Hale, BSN, RN; Bonnie L. Johnson, BAN, RN; Joy L. Lee, BAN, RN; Kathleen A. Poppe, MS, RN

  • Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services. 2007;45(10):15-18
  • Posted October 1, 2007

Abstract

Genotyping for CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 variations is emerging as a potentially useful clinical tool to help mental health professionals prescribe psychiatric medications for their patients. Cytochrome P450 testing uses a blood sample to determine an individual’s required dosage of identified drugs that are metabolized by the two enzymes. To provide care for patients and families, nurses should be able to demonstrate identified essential nursing competencies related to genetics and genomics, which include an understanding of cytochrome P450 testing. As patient advocates, nurses are expected to understand how to identify patients most likely to benefit from CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 testing, how to ensure informed consent for such testing, and how to educate patients about testing and test results.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Ms. Pestka is Assistant Professor of Nursing, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, and Nursing Education Specialist, Mayo Clinic, Ms. Hale, Ms. Johnson, and Ms. Lee are Registered Nurses, and Ms. Poppe is Nurse Manager, Psychiatry, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.

The authors disclose that they have no significant financial interests in any product or class of products discussed directly or indirectly in this activity, including research support.

Address correspondence to Elizabeth L. Pestka, MS, APRN, BC, APNG, Assistant Professor of Nursing, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Nursing Education Specialist, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905; e-mail: pestka.elizabeth@mayo.edu.

Abstract

Genotyping for CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 variations is emerging as a potentially useful clinical tool to help mental health professionals prescribe psychiatric medications for their patients. Cytochrome P450 testing uses a blood sample to determine an individual’s required dosage of identified drugs that are metabolized by the two enzymes. To provide care for patients and families, nurses should be able to demonstrate identified essential nursing competencies related to genetics and genomics, which include an understanding of cytochrome P450 testing. As patient advocates, nurses are expected to understand how to identify patients most likely to benefit from CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 testing, how to ensure informed consent for such testing, and how to educate patients about testing and test results.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Ms. Pestka is Assistant Professor of Nursing, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, and Nursing Education Specialist, Mayo Clinic, Ms. Hale, Ms. Johnson, and Ms. Lee are Registered Nurses, and Ms. Poppe is Nurse Manager, Psychiatry, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.

The authors disclose that they have no significant financial interests in any product or class of products discussed directly or indirectly in this activity, including research support.

Address correspondence to Elizabeth L. Pestka, MS, APRN, BC, APNG, Assistant Professor of Nursing, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Nursing Education Specialist, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905; e-mail: pestka.elizabeth@mayo.edu.

ABSTRACT

Genotyping for CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 variations is emerging as a potentially useful clinical tool to help mental health professionals prescribe psychiatric medications for their patients. Cytochrome P450 testing uses a blood sample to determine an individual’s required dosage of identified drugs that are metabolized by the two enzymes. To provide care for patients and families, nurses should be able to demonstrate identified essential nursing competencies related to genetics and genomics, which include an understanding of cytochrome P450 testing. As patient advocates, nurses are expected to understand how to identify patients most likely to benefit from CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 testing, how to ensure informed consent for such testing, and how to educate patients about testing and test results.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Ms. Pestka is Assistant Professor of Nursing, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, and Nursing Education Specialist, Mayo Clinic, Ms. Hale, Ms. Johnson, and Ms. Lee are Registered Nurses, and Ms. Poppe is Nurse Manager, Psychiatry, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.

The authors disclose that they have no significant financial interests in any product or class of products discussed directly or indirectly in this activity, including research support.

Address correspondence to Elizabeth L. Pestka, MS, APRN, BC, APNG, Assistant Professor of Nursing, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Nursing Education Specialist, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905; e-mail: pestka.elizabeth@mayo.edu.

Sign up to receive

Journal E-contents