Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services

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Aging Matters 

Remembering Hurricane Katrina

Mary-Earle Farrell; Jeanne M. Sorrell, PhD, RN, FAAN

  • Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services. 2007;45(1):15-18
  • Posted January 1, 2007

Abstract

EXCERPT

In addition to food, medical services, and shelter, many refugees of Hurricane Katrina also needed mental health services to help them cope with devastating losses. I talked with Jeanne Sorrell, my colleague at George Mason University and the Aging Matters Section Editor, about my experiences in Mississippi in 2006, volunteering with Katrina survivors, and we decided to share those experiences in this article to highlight the mental stress that many older adults faced after Katrina and that many are still experiencing. Here is my story.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Ms. Farrell is Director of Development, College of Health and Human Services, and Associate Director of University Development, and Dr. Sorrell is Associate Dean, Academic Programs and Research, College of Health and Human Services, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia.

Address correspondence to Mary-Earle Farrell, Director of Development, College of Health and Human Services, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, MSN 267, Fairfax, VA 22030; e-mail: mfarrel1@gmu.edu.

Abstract

EXCERPT

In addition to food, medical services, and shelter, many refugees of Hurricane Katrina also needed mental health services to help them cope with devastating losses. I talked with Jeanne Sorrell, my colleague at George Mason University and the Aging Matters Section Editor, about my experiences in Mississippi in 2006, volunteering with Katrina survivors, and we decided to share those experiences in this article to highlight the mental stress that many older adults faced after Katrina and that many are still experiencing. Here is my story.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Ms. Farrell is Director of Development, College of Health and Human Services, and Associate Director of University Development, and Dr. Sorrell is Associate Dean, Academic Programs and Research, College of Health and Human Services, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia.

Address correspondence to Mary-Earle Farrell, Director of Development, College of Health and Human Services, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, MSN 267, Fairfax, VA 22030; e-mail: mfarrel1@gmu.edu.

EXCERPT

In addition to food, medical services, and shelter, many refugees of Hurricane Katrina also needed mental health services to help them cope with devastating losses. I talked with Jeanne Sorrell, my colleague at George Mason University and the Aging Matters Section Editor, about my experiences in Mississippi in 2006, volunteering with Katrina survivors, and we decided to share those experiences in this article to highlight the mental stress that many older adults faced after Katrina and that many are still experiencing. Here is my story.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Ms. Farrell is Director of Development, College of Health and Human Services, and Associate Director of University Development, and Dr. Sorrell is Associate Dean, Academic Programs and Research, College of Health and Human Services, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia.

Address correspondence to Mary-Earle Farrell, Director of Development, College of Health and Human Services, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, MSN 267, Fairfax, VA 22030; e-mail: mfarrel1@gmu.edu.

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