Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services

Psychopharmacology 

Glutamate-Modulating Drugs and the Treatment of Mental Disorders

Robert H. Howland, MD

Abstract

EXCERPT

Chemical neurotransmitters mediate the actions of all known psychotropic drugs (Snyder & Ferris, 2000). Although many studies have focused on classic neurotransmitters (e.g., norepinephrine, serotonin, dopamine), many other neurochemicals operate as neurotransmitters. These novel neurotransmitters are important for normal brain functioning, but they likely contribute to the pathophysiology of mental and neurological disorders. They may provide additional or alternative ways to explain how many psychotropic medications work, and they might be suitable targets for the development of new medications.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Howland is Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The author discloses that he has no significant financial interests in any product or class of products discussed directly or indirectly in this activity, including research support.

Address correspondence to Robert H. Howland, MD, Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, 3811 O’Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213; e-mail: HowlandRH@upmc.edu.

Abstract

EXCERPT

Chemical neurotransmitters mediate the actions of all known psychotropic drugs (Snyder & Ferris, 2000). Although many studies have focused on classic neurotransmitters (e.g., norepinephrine, serotonin, dopamine), many other neurochemicals operate as neurotransmitters. These novel neurotransmitters are important for normal brain functioning, but they likely contribute to the pathophysiology of mental and neurological disorders. They may provide additional or alternative ways to explain how many psychotropic medications work, and they might be suitable targets for the development of new medications.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Howland is Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The author discloses that he has no significant financial interests in any product or class of products discussed directly or indirectly in this activity, including research support.

Address correspondence to Robert H. Howland, MD, Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, 3811 O’Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213; e-mail: HowlandRH@upmc.edu.

EXCERPT

Chemical neurotransmitters mediate the actions of all known psychotropic drugs (Snyder & Ferris, 2000). Although many studies have focused on classic neurotransmitters (e.g., norepinephrine, serotonin, dopamine), many other neurochemicals operate as neurotransmitters. These novel neurotransmitters are important for normal brain functioning, but they likely contribute to the pathophysiology of mental and neurological disorders. They may provide additional or alternative ways to explain how many psychotropic medications work, and they might be suitable targets for the development of new medications.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Howland is Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The author discloses that he has no significant financial interests in any product or class of products discussed directly or indirectly in this activity, including research support.

Address correspondence to Robert H. Howland, MD, Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, 3811 O’Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213; e-mail: HowlandRH@upmc.edu.

10.3928/02793695-20070101-04

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