Journal of Nursing Education

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Major Articles 

Second-Career Baccalaureate Nursing Students: A Lived Experience

Paula Scharf Kohn, PhD, RN; Marie Truglio-Londrigan, PhD, RN, GNP

  • Journal of Nursing Education. 2007;46(9)
  • Posted September 1, 2007

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Second-career baccalaureate nursing programs and the students enrolled in them have been a topic of interest since these programs were first introduced into the academic setting in the 1970s. The purpose of this phenomenological inquiry was to develop an understanding of the meaning of the lived experience of being a second-career baccalaureate nursing student. Five second-career baccalaureate nursing students participated in unstructured, in-depth, face-to-face interviews. Data analysis was guided by the phenomenological method of van Manen. The themes identified were Questioning One’s Place in the World; Seeing One’s Place in the World in Another Way; Preparing for the Plunge; Trying Transitions; A Bundle of Emotions; Faculty Control, Student Imbalance; and Almost There and Scared. Implications of this research related to curriculum revision are presented.

AUTHORS

Received: August 4, 2006

Accepted: September 22, 2006

Dr. Kohn is Associate Professor, and Dr. Truglio-Londrigan is Professor, Pace University, Lienhard School of Nursing, Pleasantville, New York.

The authors wish to thank Dean Harriet Feldman, Lienhard School of Nursing, for her support during this research endeavor. They also acknowledge financial support from the Lienhard School of Nursing Endowment Fund and the Pace University Scholarly Research Award.

Address correspondence to Paula Scharf Kohn, PhD, RN, Associate Professor, Pace University, Lienhard School of Nursing, 861 Bedford Road, Pleasantville, NY 10570; e-mail: pscharf@pace.edu.

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Second-career baccalaureate nursing programs and the students enrolled in them have been a topic of interest since these programs were first introduced into the academic setting in the 1970s. The purpose of this phenomenological inquiry was to develop an understanding of the meaning of the lived experience of being a second-career baccalaureate nursing student. Five second-career baccalaureate nursing students participated in unstructured, in-depth, face-to-face interviews. Data analysis was guided by the phenomenological method of van Manen. The themes identified were Questioning One’s Place in the World; Seeing One’s Place in the World in Another Way; Preparing for the Plunge; Trying Transitions; A Bundle of Emotions; Faculty Control, Student Imbalance; and Almost There and Scared. Implications of this research related to curriculum revision are presented.

AUTHORS

Received: August 4, 2006

Accepted: September 22, 2006

Dr. Kohn is Associate Professor, and Dr. Truglio-Londrigan is Professor, Pace University, Lienhard School of Nursing, Pleasantville, New York.

The authors wish to thank Dean Harriet Feldman, Lienhard School of Nursing, for her support during this research endeavor. They also acknowledge financial support from the Lienhard School of Nursing Endowment Fund and the Pace University Scholarly Research Award.

Address correspondence to Paula Scharf Kohn, PhD, RN, Associate Professor, Pace University, Lienhard School of Nursing, 861 Bedford Road, Pleasantville, NY 10570; e-mail: pscharf@pace.edu.

ABSTRACT

Second-career baccalaureate nursing programs and the students enrolled in them have been a topic of interest since these programs were first introduced into the academic setting in the 1970s. The purpose of this phenomenological inquiry was to develop an understanding of the meaning of the lived experience of being a second-career baccalaureate nursing student. Five second-career baccalaureate nursing students participated in unstructured, in-depth, face-to-face interviews. Data analysis was guided by the phenomenological method of van Manen. The themes identified were Questioning One’s Place in the World; Seeing One’s Place in the World in Another Way; Preparing for the Plunge; Trying Transitions; A Bundle of Emotions; Faculty Control, Student Imbalance; and Almost There and Scared. Implications of this research related to curriculum revision are presented.

AUTHORS

Received: August 4, 2006

Accepted: September 22, 2006

Dr. Kohn is Associate Professor, and Dr. Truglio-Londrigan is Professor, Pace University, Lienhard School of Nursing, Pleasantville, New York.

The authors wish to thank Dean Harriet Feldman, Lienhard School of Nursing, for her support during this research endeavor. They also acknowledge financial support from the Lienhard School of Nursing Endowment Fund and the Pace University Scholarly Research Award.

Address correspondence to Paula Scharf Kohn, PhD, RN, Associate Professor, Pace University, Lienhard School of Nursing, 861 Bedford Road, Pleasantville, NY 10570; e-mail: pscharf@pace.edu.

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