Journal of Nursing Education

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Educational Innovations 

Avoiding Socialization Pitfalls in Accelerated Second-Degree Nursing Education: The Returning-to-School Syndrome Model

Queen Utley-Smith, EdD, RN; Beth Phillips, MSN, RN, CNE; Kathleen Turner, MSN, RN

  • Journal of Nursing Education. 2007;46(9)
  • Posted September 1, 2007

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Second-degree students are highly motivated and tend to excel academically. However, nurse educators in accelerated programs face challenges in socializing these students to the nursing role. One pitfall is the hostility that may develop if students perceive a mismatch between their expectations and their new role as baccalaureate nursing (BSN) students in a fast-paced and intense program. This article discusses the applicability of the returning-to-school syndrome model in helping second-degree nursing students maneuver successfully through an accelerated BSN program. This 3-stage model has been previously applied in RN-to-BSN education. Using the model in an accelerated BSN curriculum to identify transition points and offer student support through specific stages can better prepare students to meet the challenges of accelerated education, as well as help nurse educators become more adept at providing resources and implementing supportive strategies at the appropriate time.

AUTHORS

Received: September 2, 2006

Accepted: February 23, 2007

Dr. Utley-Smith is Assistant Professor, and Ms. Phillips and Ms. Turner are Assistant Clinical Professors, Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, North Carolina.

The authors would like to thank Elizabeth Flint, PhD, for her thoughtful comments.

Address correspondence to Queen Utley-Smith, EdD, RN, Assistant Professor, P.O. Box 3322 DUMC, Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, NC 27710; e-mail: utley005@mc.duke.edu.

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Second-degree students are highly motivated and tend to excel academically. However, nurse educators in accelerated programs face challenges in socializing these students to the nursing role. One pitfall is the hostility that may develop if students perceive a mismatch between their expectations and their new role as baccalaureate nursing (BSN) students in a fast-paced and intense program. This article discusses the applicability of the returning-to-school syndrome model in helping second-degree nursing students maneuver successfully through an accelerated BSN program. This 3-stage model has been previously applied in RN-to-BSN education. Using the model in an accelerated BSN curriculum to identify transition points and offer student support through specific stages can better prepare students to meet the challenges of accelerated education, as well as help nurse educators become more adept at providing resources and implementing supportive strategies at the appropriate time.

AUTHORS

Received: September 2, 2006

Accepted: February 23, 2007

Dr. Utley-Smith is Assistant Professor, and Ms. Phillips and Ms. Turner are Assistant Clinical Professors, Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, North Carolina.

The authors would like to thank Elizabeth Flint, PhD, for her thoughtful comments.

Address correspondence to Queen Utley-Smith, EdD, RN, Assistant Professor, P.O. Box 3322 DUMC, Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, NC 27710; e-mail: utley005@mc.duke.edu.

ABSTRACT

Second-degree students are highly motivated and tend to excel academically. However, nurse educators in accelerated programs face challenges in socializing these students to the nursing role. One pitfall is the hostility that may develop if students perceive a mismatch between their expectations and their new role as baccalaureate nursing (BSN) students in a fast-paced and intense program. This article discusses the applicability of the returning-to-school syndrome model in helping second-degree nursing students maneuver successfully through an accelerated BSN program. This 3-stage model has been previously applied in RN-to-BSN education. Using the model in an accelerated BSN curriculum to identify transition points and offer student support through specific stages can better prepare students to meet the challenges of accelerated education, as well as help nurse educators become more adept at providing resources and implementing supportive strategies at the appropriate time.

AUTHORS

Received: September 2, 2006

Accepted: February 23, 2007

Dr. Utley-Smith is Assistant Professor, and Ms. Phillips and Ms. Turner are Assistant Clinical Professors, Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, North Carolina.

The authors would like to thank Elizabeth Flint, PhD, for her thoughtful comments.

Address correspondence to Queen Utley-Smith, EdD, RN, Assistant Professor, P.O. Box 3322 DUMC, Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, NC 27710; e-mail: utley005@mc.duke.edu.

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