Journal of Nursing Education

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Guest Editorial 

Accelerated Baccalaureate Programs: What We Know and What We Need to Know—Setting a Research Agenda

Judy A. Beal, DNSc, RN

  • Journal of Nursing Education. 2007;46(9)
  • Posted September 1, 2007

Abstract

EXCERPT

In 1971, the first accelerated baccalaureate nursing program in the United States was launched. Today, there are 197 such programs, with 37 more in the planning stages (American Association of Colleges of Nursing [AACN], 2007). Although there has been a rapid proliferation of these programs, especially during the past 10 years, the amount of research on the nature, quality, and outcomes of such programs remains limited in both quantity and generalizability.

AUTHOR

Judy A. Beal, DNSc, RN is Professor and Chair of Nursing, Associate Dean, School for Health Studies, Simmons College, Boston, Massachusetts

Abstract

EXCERPT

In 1971, the first accelerated baccalaureate nursing program in the United States was launched. Today, there are 197 such programs, with 37 more in the planning stages (American Association of Colleges of Nursing [AACN], 2007). Although there has been a rapid proliferation of these programs, especially during the past 10 years, the amount of research on the nature, quality, and outcomes of such programs remains limited in both quantity and generalizability.

AUTHOR

Judy A. Beal, DNSc, RN is Professor and Chair of Nursing, Associate Dean, School for Health Studies, Simmons College, Boston, Massachusetts

EXCERPT

In 1971, the first accelerated baccalaureate nursing program in the United States was launched. Today, there are 197 such programs, with 37 more in the planning stages (American Association of Colleges of Nursing [AACN], 2007). Although there has been a rapid proliferation of these programs, especially during the past 10 years, the amount of research on the nature, quality, and outcomes of such programs remains limited in both quantity and generalizability.

AUTHOR

Judy A. Beal, DNSc, RN is Professor and Chair of Nursing, Associate Dean, School for Health Studies, Simmons College, Boston, Massachusetts

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